Tag Archives: fashion

17Mar/17
Diane Linston

Diane Linston is All that is Glitz and Glamour for the Girls

Diane LinstonAccording to Fashion Designer Diane Linston, fashion should always be high-key, up-beat, and fashionably fun. Sequins fashion is still a hot trend for the 2017 fall season and Linston has her finger on the pulse of glitz and glamour with style creations that transcend from business casual to red carpet glamour. If you still think that sequins are only good for a night out, then Diane Linston, creative director of Style of Imagination Inc. has a wardrobe solution that is lifestyle changing.

The Styles of Imagination collection is carried by fifteen retail boutiques throughout the United States; and the brand offers two collections for the style conscious shopper. The NGU Collection offers finer fabrics, detailing and embellishments; while the DYL Collection is moderately priced. The NGU collection means (Never Give Up), and is all about being positive, high spirited with perseverance. “I have faced very traumatic and discouraging times in my life and I praise glory to God for keeping me positive in order to persevere. By never giving up on my dream to launch my fashion line, I now create fashion designs that are uplifting and sophisticated for the everyday woman. For me being creative is healing. I believe being positive and never giving up on our dreams is how every woman should live her life …Positive and glamorous!” explains Linston.

It’s time for girls to try something new; namely sequins as daywear! Rock a sequins or rhinestone top that is moderately price, and easily match it with a basic or classic bottom piece without over spending. The NGU collection also includes denim suits and separates that are stylish and sophisticated for women ages twenty-five through sixty years of age. A sophisticated woman who wears NGU never gives up. And neither will those flirtatious guys.

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Diane Linston Diane Linston Diane Linston

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25Jan/17
Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa, Read Why

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

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Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

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Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

“The most important part of a tree is the root” says Tandra Birkett, who is not only the executive producer of Harlem Fashion Week, but she is also a historian.  And as a historian she recognizes the importance of Harlem’s cultural roots… Africa.  As a result HFW donates a portion of its proceeds to the Senegalese American Bilingual School and their initiative The Big Goree Project. The goal of the Big Goree Project is the restoration of the The House of Slaves, the originial slave fortress into  a Slave Museum on Goree Island in Senegal, West Africa. “We believe that it is integral to maintain a productive connection with Africa and the arts, more specifically fashion, is an avenue that we used to sustain that connection.”  As a result, one month after the historic grand opening of Harlem Fashion Week in the fall of 2016, Tandra and Yvonne were on a plane to Senegal, West Africa. “We did not want to just give money but we wanted to personally connect with our roots ”.

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

The creative director of Harlem Fashion Week,  Yvonne Jewnell is also the lead designer and co-owner of the fashion design company Yvonne Jewnell New York LLC.  As a designer, the culture, texture and history of Africa are the inspiration for her design aesthetic. “Fashion is art and my art must reflect my heritage.  I have always been drawn to creativity and story of African culture and I want my designs to reflect the interconnectivity of an African in America. Actually going to Senegal was not only a personal transformation but it was also a design inspiration that will be reflected in my new collection, showing on February 12, 2017 on the main stage of Harlem Fashion Week.” Yvonne Jewnell.

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa  Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa While in Senegal Tandra and Yvonne visited the Senegalese American Bilingual School, it was a refreshing experience to visit with Stephanie Kane and the students of SABS. Tandra shared, “As an educator I was so excited to meet the children, I had to jump in on their lecture about Christopher Columbus, it was a great experience!”

Support Our Cause

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa   Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa Tandra and Yvonne also had the pleasure of visiting the mayor’s office at Goree Island and meeting with the Chief of Staff Mamadou Adama Diop, we discussed ways of building a stronger relationship with Goree Island and the African Diaspora through the arts and education.

Harlem Fashion Week Tickets

Tandra shared, “The last part of our pilgrimage to Senegal was bittersweet, it was time to visit the slave fortress on Goree Island and stand at the “Door of No Return” the place where the ancestors stood before they were stolen from Senegal forever”. Tandra said, “As I approached the The House of Slaves, Le Maison des Esclaves I literally broke down in tears, I could feel the pain of my ancestors.”

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

Tandra and Yvonne came back to the states with a new sense of vision and purpose. Harlem Fashion Week will once again be donating funds to the Big Goree Project, your ticket purchase to the February 12th Runway Show at The Museum of the City of NewYork will help to restore La Maison Des Enclaves into an Amazing museum and the Door of No Return Will become “The Door of Return” for the African Diaspora.

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa   Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

Harlem Fashion Week hope that you will join us on February 12th, knowing that your ticket purchase helps to not only build a female-minority owned women’s business in the United States but HFW is also helping to restore relationships with the African continent and financially support the children and institutions in Senegal, West Africa.

Harlem Fashion Week Tickets

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

“Special Thanks to:

Eugene Adams, the Director of Collaborative Education at Bronx Community College, the American liaison of the Big Goree Project,

Stephanie Kane, Founder and Director of the Senegalese American Bilingual School

Mr. Sandaro Fame, our guide and educator at  SABS

Mamadou Adama Diop the Chief of Staff for the mayors office at Goree Island”

For More Information: info@harlemfw.com

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17Dec/16
yeezy

Is Yeezy Season Over?!

 You seen Yeezy’s new line?! That s%#t is ugly bro!

..says the guy trying to convince me while contradictly standing in a distressed sweater from a popular Euro brand. It’s insane how the same people who disrespect one’s art surprisingly have the audacity to purchase mimicry. Now, I’m not saying Kanye’s prices for Yeezy pieces aren’t outstandingly ridiculous, that’s another topic for another day. I guess what I’m trying to convey is, how does one depreciate his (Kanye’s) designs, then, with the same mouth, say to the cashier “Yeah, I want to buy this” while presenting a garment literally inspired by Yeezy. It’s okay, I will ask Yeezus to forgive them of their blasphemy, they know not what they do. 

Here’s an interesting question; What about the individualistic stylish people who’ve been wearing distressed garments before Yeezy season?! To those I say, there are two things you can do in these times of abused trends. One, box up and store away all the pieces that are obvious participants of the “distress” trend. The only other thing one can do is separate themselves from the doppelgängers by staying true to the style before it became a trend. People who are trendy-chasers are like “wave surfers”… when the “wave” dies, so will their “surfing”. In other words, when the trend dies, the ones who were true to the “distress” style by it being their lifestyle (because there’s a difference – style v. lifestyle) will continue being… themselves!

Unfortunately it’s continuously growing, top fashion-retail companies, of affordable pricing for the majority of society, are producing Yeezy mimicry pieces and more and more people are absorbing the trend. So, will the abuse of the trend heat up so much that it ends Yeezy Season quicker than expected? Will you pack away your distressed garments until Yeezy season passes along with the creation of its disasters (people abusing the trend)? Or will you stay genuine and fight through the disasters Yeezy season has involuntarily created? These aren’t jabs at Kanye West for the awesome creative direction behind this season of Yeezy, but definitely stabs at those who trend-surf and don’t have a life-style which kills fashion as quick as it’s launched. Choose your fate and may Yeezus be with you.

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02Dec/16
Wear All Black

Why Do People Wear All Black? – Trends vs Staples

“I’m about to wear all black for a year straight..” said Jay-Z on “Death of Autotune” which released in 2009 off of his Blueprint 3 album. So why is it that now, eight/nine years later, wearing all black has become so trendy throughout the entire world –especially New York City! Maybe it was Kanye West with his monochromatic looks he’d wear and inspire various celebrities to wear as well. Did Ye’ do it again? Is Kanye to credit for yet another trend swallowed by the fashion forwards? Or is it a lackadaisical effort for depicting ones mood of “I didn’t know what to wear.” Don’t get me wrong, the black monochrome look is pretty artistic when pieced in an artsy manner. But let’s be honest, not everyone who wears all black seems to be reflecting it in a form of fashion, which is also considered art. I wonder how the Gothic society feels that their “uniform color” is now looked at as trendy by larger society. There was once a time where you only wore all black if you were attending a funeral, working for a particular retail company, or considered yourself emo/goth. Well, that has all changed now hasn’t it.

Last week, I randomly stopped a woman wearing the monochromatic black look and I asked her “What about all-black do you like?” She explained how deeply she perceived the color, while also clarifying with me that “it’s a shade, not a color.” She then stated how all-black provides a sort of mirror for the observer. Further explaining how black allows the public to perceive however they feel, so if you feel their look is sad and depressing then that says more about yourself, same as if you perceive it as rich, said by the fashionable young lady awaiting her Uber. She then concluded, “It’s like a painting… I am fashion therefore I am walking art. There is no right or wrong when perceiving a piece. Either you have a vision of some form of the art or you see… nothing.” I’m not sure if everyone has the same cognitive likeness for wearing all-black but I can say, I definitely appreciated her creative way of thinking. It allowed me to then perceive the many other black outfits I later witnessed that day, and even now. All black has become a staple within fashion by being more than just a trend. I mean, it’s been what, nine years since Jay-Z rapped the lyric which is the epitome of today’s no. 1 trend. How will you wear it? Lackadaisicalness of “I didn’t know what to wear” or artistically allowing observers their own perception as “a piece of walking art”?

I’ve complied this look to give you an idea of how to put together an all-black look in an artistic manner:

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—Calvin Chandler

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29Sep/16
bOBETTE eIZA

bOBETTE eIZA Debutes the Luxe “Hilda” Handbag Collection

bOBETTE eIZAbOBETTE eIZA debutes the Luxe “Hilda” Handbag Collection. A woman’s fashion choice is her self-expression statement. For many women, handbags are a personal accessory that compliments and completes her outfit. It’s a part of what makes fashion alluring. Newly launched luxury handbag label, bOBETTE eIZA, dominates with meticulous attention to style and details.

An avid New Yorker, Bobette Reid is the owner and designer of bOBETTE eIZA, which launched its first tote collection “Hilda“ this spring fashion season. The extraordinary collection can be described in two words: timeless sustainability. Named after her Aunt, the Hilda handbag is crafted in an assortment of vibrant of colors, paired with quality materials which make it wearable for all seasons. Materials are selectively hand-picked while paying close attention to details. Its functional design is versatile, making it an eye-catching temptation.

bOBETTE eIZAStructured, high fashion, with ample space, each design features top-zip closures, adjustable cross body straps, and multi-functional interior slip pockets for easy access to smaller items.  Hilda is made from a variety of leather materials including hologram python, cow, and alligator embossed leather. The tote style handbag comes in one size, medium, and ranges in price from $3,195 to $3,298.

When asked which bag is her favorite, Bobette explained, “it’s very difficult to choose because I love them all. I intentionally designed the collection that way”. The extraordinarily classy Hilda tote is a must have accessory. It exudes opulence and beauty.

The stylish Luxe collection may be purchased at www.bobetteeiza.com and exclusive high end retail stores.

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27Sep/16
Harlem Fashion Week

Harlem Fashion Week 2016’s Epic Inauguration

Harlem Fashion WeekSince the days of the Renaissance, Harlem has served as the epicenter of music, literature, art and fashion. As Harlem is being revitalized in the 21st century, Harlem Fashion Week (HFW) introduces a new era of fashion culture to the Harlem community, inspired by its rich cultural heritage.

Harlem Fashion Week is an explosion of culture that bridges the Downtown fashion hub to the Uptown vibe for a rich community experience. It showcases the fashion industry, provides business education for emerging designers, grows Harlem businesses, creates a cultural platform, and just exudes fun!

The inaugural HFW kick off had its opening night celebration on September 7th and culminated with Runway Shows on September 9th at the historic Museum of the City of New York on 5th avenue and Central Park. The four-day event was hosted at restaurants, businesses and cultural centers all throughout the Harlem community and attracted guests that included fashion industry professionals, members of the media, artists, entertainers, buyers and a host of VIPs.

Harlem Fashion Week’s Schedule Included:
• Opening Night Celebration at the Hamilton Landmark Galleries
• Runway Show at the Museum of the City of New York
• The Business of Fashion Symposium at The Harlem State Office Building
• After Party at a posh Harlem venue
• Fashion Awards Ceremony at Museum of the City of New York
• HFW Fashion Brunch at Cheri Harlem
• Production Open House conducted by Manufacture NY

The creators of Harlem Fashion Week are the dynamic mother-daughter team of Tandra Birkett and Yvonne Jewnell, owners of the fashion design company Yvonne Jewnell New York LLC. Yvonne Jewnell New York is an award winning women’s wear company that creates clothing that promotes women empowerment and celebrates culture from across the globe. Combined, they used their talent, skill, and education to create one of the most innovative, emerging fashion houses.

As a company, Yvonne Jewnell New York LLC is a member of Harlem Arts Alliance and Harlem Chamber of Commerce. It has participated in the Annual Harlem Week Festival, hosted a Pop-Up Shop at the Black River Studio, and produced fashion shows at the Hip Hop Cultural Center and the ImageNation Raw Space. It is only natural that they would produce Harlem Fashion Week to celebrate the rich cultural heritage of Harlem.

A portion of the proceeds from HFW will go to the restoration project of La Maison des Esclaves – The House of Slaves Museum on Goree Island in Senegal.

Visit www.HarlemFW.com for more information!

Garments by designers:
Isah Conteh, The 3rdEyeBrand, Hatchers, Simply Ma’am, Visions by Teonah Knighton, Next Level World, Yvonne Jewnell New York

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27Aug/16
Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

A Prestigious Event in Honour of our Queens: Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

Music Fashion QueendomsTaji Mag, together with ShowbizAfrica and HardRock Café SA, hosted one of the most prestigious events in honour of our Queens: Music, Fashion, & Queendoms. Women from all walks of life came together to honour one another’s crafts in the creative space.

“Africans must change their mind and actions. The keys to building your continent depends on your will-power, persistent effort and action towards self-liberation.”
— Lailah Gifty Akita

There were motivational talks, book readings, showcasing of local brands, and of course the night wouldn’t end without a prize.

This night was supported by the likes of:

Author of ‘Sigh the Beloved Country’ Bongani Madondo,

Radio Personality, Lebo Magolego

CEO of Malose Communications, Mr J

Music Fashion Queendoms  Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

 

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

An array of fresh talent currently pushing their way towards their dreams, entertained the guests & supporters of this initiative, many incorporating a tribute to the Queens. The depth & variation of the rising creative talent, the aim is to nurture, was showcased by:

*Thabiso Thabethe

*Marley Bloo

*Queen Ofee

*House of Khalid Couture

*Queen Ink

*BlackDiamond

*KausKalture

*Dj

* Sinesipho Ngemntu

* Sabelo Moya

* Sphephelo Dludlu

* Kwanda Mchunu

 Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

‘Marley Bloo’ on vocals.

Hard Rock Cafe, Nelson Mandela Square, was a fitting venue with memorabilia displayed from various musical legends, giving some of these new artists a first taste of performing in an upscale venue.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

‘Dj Khanyi’ on the decks.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

Model and singer ‘BlackDiamond’

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

Our lovely queen from the audience for the Duku demonstration.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

‘Queen Ofee’ with her Organic products from, Taji Shop SA.

Here’s to the crazy ones… the misfits… the rebels… the trouble makers… the round pegs in the square holes… The ones who see things differently- they’re not fond of rules… You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can’t do is ignore them because they change things… They push the human race forward, and while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

‘The Khalid Sisters’ rocking their Duku’s.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

‘Thabiso Thabethe’ on the strings.

If we achieve a richer culture, rich in contrasting values, we must recognize the whole gamut of human potentialities, and so, weave a less arbitrary social fabric, one in which each diverse human gift will find a fitting place.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

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09Jun/16
Tematik

Beautiful Head & Body Wraps from Tematik

Tematik is a beautiful line of Head & Body Wraps. Created by stylist, Emmanuelle Sundiata, originally from Martinique, Emmanuelle uses vivid fabrics for the most elegant wrap styles!

TematikBoutik

Emmanuelle Sundiata

Creative Mare Tet
Concept Store Multi Ethnik TEMATIK
113 Blenac Street 3rd floor, Fort de France
Facebook
www.ateliermaretet.com

Tematik Tematik

Tematik Tematik

Tematik

Tematik

Tematik

Tematik

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19Jan/16
Black Girls in Rome

Black Girls in Rome: Super Dope Web Series

Black Girls in RomeBlack Girls in Rome is a scripted web series that follows the life and adventures of a young Black woman who decides to give Italy a try after suffering a broken heart in New York. The storyline is loosely based on the life of Dr. Tamara Pizzoli, a native of Texas who has spent the better part of the last decade in the eternal city. Dr. Pizzoli is the writer, director & executive producer of the project. Renowned Dominican-Italian actress Iris Peynado plays a role in the series and serves as an associate producer.

Black Girls in Rome: Ever consider quitting your life as you know it and starting fresh… abroad?

Comprised of eight episodes, the show highlights not only typical Roman life, but the type of existence that can be crafted, honed and enjoyed in a new and drastically unfamiliar environment if one simply has the courage to leap. A reflection of modern times and struggles both in New York and Italy, Black Girls in Rome depicts a thirty-something year old woman of color’s narrative with an exciting amount of international mobility. Scenes for the show were shot in New York, Rome and Marrakech, Morocco. At a time when the need for positive Black imagery and narratives as well as accurate representation of Black culture is sorely needed, Black Girls in Rome offers a visually and mentally dazzling getaway for viewers and looks to delight with its content.

Black Girls in Rome will debut in the spring of 2016. The trailer can be viewed here:

For additional information and updates, you’re welcomed to visit pizzolimedia.com.

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14Jan/16
fresh dressed

Fresh Dressed Relives How Hip Hop Culture Impacts Fashion

Fresh Dressed was released in 2015 and directed by Sacha Jenkins. This documentary embodies the story of how hip hop has affected the fashion world. Fashion means individuality. Clothing was a way for people to show their distinct and unique sense of style. From times of slavery to modern day, fashion was an influential aspect in African American culture. In order for slave masters to be considered “good Christians,” they would make sure that their slaves had at least one “good” outfit when going to church. From this, the term “Sunday’s Best” was born. Generally, people would attend church wearing their best attire. This trend has naturally followed us through the generations from Africa and seeped into our everyday lives, culturally inspiring our style.

Hip Hop has been a major influence on the fashion community. Fresh Dressed starts with Gino and Rosa describing their outfits enthusiastically during an interview. They sported Kangol hats and Adidas with fat laces. This trend was called “B-boy/B-girl”. A B-boy or B-girl was a person who is known for dancing to the drum break section of a song. The fad began in the Bronx in 1973. The majority of rappers dressed in “B-boy style”. According to Run DMC, they decided to dress this way in order to connect to their fan base. The fans would be able to relate to them and say “he looks just like me.” During this time, “Dress for Success” was popular in schools. Also, gangs or street families began to emerge during the seventies in the south Bronx. Men in gangs would wear Lee’s jeans and denim vests with motorcycle jackets underneath. In 1971, a member of the Ghetto Brothers, Cornell “Black Benjy” Benjamin was murdered for attempting to prevent an altercation between two rival gangs. On December 7, 1971, the Ghetto Brothers organized a peace meeting and a truce was formed.

The street was considered a runway for different clothing brands. People who grew up in the projects that wanted to make a statement would wear loud colors. For example, guys from Brooklyn or “Brooklyn Cats” would war Clarks shark skins and Cazal glasses with no lenses. The colors of hip hop originated from graffiti. Jean jackets were the first canvas for hip hop. At the time, customizing one’s jeans was popular. Fashion designers such as Dapper Dan and Shirt King Phade were at large. Dapper Dan owned a boutique in the city and would remix designer brands on pieces of clothing. Unfortunately, Dapper Dan’s boutique was shut down for copyright infringement and Yo MTV Raps blurred out his designs. There were other fads that came and went during the 80s and 90s like fat laces, baggy jeans, Cross Colours, and Karl Kani.

This documentary gave me more insight into how fashion was impacted by hip hop. I was intrigued by how people made their outfits distinct. Fashion is a way to communicate one’s personality in a new light. There is so much history crammed into this documentary and I would definitely recommend it to people who want to learn more about how hip hop coincides with fashion.

Catch it on Netflix or purchase it by clicking on the Rent or Buy now links below!

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