Category Archives: Lifestyle

26Jan/17

Photo Story: “Helios” The God of the Sun

Helios
Photography & Set Design |
Jefferson Ariaga @haremgraphia
Royal, Makeup, Styling |
Emma Theresa @emma_eazyliving

“Helios is known as the god of the sun in greek mythology. I always show the paramount nature of the black woman. With the defined and unyielding beauty which Emma has, I had no other in mind to show what the god of the sun looks like.”

Jefferson Ariaga is a Nigerian Boston based fashion photographer.

helios

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26Jan/17
missy elliott

Missy Elliott Blesses Us With Another Banger

As much as we want (and NEED) Missy Elliott to be a constant presence in our lives, we’ll gladly accept these annual bangers with visual videos that make everything else current look like child’s play. From concept to choreo, this video is everything. Shout to her dancers as always! There’s levels of core and balance required to execute these moves that us sub humans cannot even imagine. Missy keep slaying!

Missy Elliott – I’m Better ft. Lamb [Official Video]

 

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25Jan/17
Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa, Read Why

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

This is the logo

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

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Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

“The most important part of a tree is the root” says Tandra Birkett, who is not only the executive producer of Harlem Fashion Week, but she is also a historian.  And as a historian she recognizes the importance of Harlem’s cultural roots… Africa.  As a result HFW donates a portion of its proceeds to the Senegalese American Bilingual School and their initiative The Big Goree Project. The goal of the Big Goree Project is the restoration of the The House of Slaves, the originial slave fortress into  a Slave Museum on Goree Island in Senegal, West Africa. “We believe that it is integral to maintain a productive connection with Africa and the arts, more specifically fashion, is an avenue that we used to sustain that connection.”  As a result, one month after the historic grand opening of Harlem Fashion Week in the fall of 2016, Tandra and Yvonne were on a plane to Senegal, West Africa. “We did not want to just give money but we wanted to personally connect with our roots ”.

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

The creative director of Harlem Fashion Week,  Yvonne Jewnell is also the lead designer and co-owner of the fashion design company Yvonne Jewnell New York LLC.  As a designer, the culture, texture and history of Africa are the inspiration for her design aesthetic. “Fashion is art and my art must reflect my heritage.  I have always been drawn to creativity and story of African culture and I want my designs to reflect the interconnectivity of an African in America. Actually going to Senegal was not only a personal transformation but it was also a design inspiration that will be reflected in my new collection, showing on February 12, 2017 on the main stage of Harlem Fashion Week.” Yvonne Jewnell.

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa  Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa While in Senegal Tandra and Yvonne visited the Senegalese American Bilingual School, it was a refreshing experience to visit with Stephanie Kane and the students of SABS. Tandra shared, “As an educator I was so excited to meet the children, I had to jump in on their lecture about Christopher Columbus, it was a great experience!”

Support Our Cause

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa   Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa Tandra and Yvonne also had the pleasure of visiting the mayor’s office at Goree Island and meeting with the Chief of Staff Mamadou Adama Diop, we discussed ways of building a stronger relationship with Goree Island and the African Diaspora through the arts and education.

Harlem Fashion Week Tickets

Tandra shared, “The last part of our pilgrimage to Senegal was bittersweet, it was time to visit the slave fortress on Goree Island and stand at the “Door of No Return” the place where the ancestors stood before they were stolen from Senegal forever”. Tandra said, “As I approached the The House of Slaves, Le Maison des Esclaves I literally broke down in tears, I could feel the pain of my ancestors.”

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

Tandra and Yvonne came back to the states with a new sense of vision and purpose. Harlem Fashion Week will once again be donating funds to the Big Goree Project, your ticket purchase to the February 12th Runway Show at The Museum of the City of NewYork will help to restore La Maison Des Enclaves into an Amazing museum and the Door of No Return Will become “The Door of Return” for the African Diaspora.

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa   Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

Harlem Fashion Week hope that you will join us on February 12th, knowing that your ticket purchase helps to not only build a female-minority owned women’s business in the United States but HFW is also helping to restore relationships with the African continent and financially support the children and institutions in Senegal, West Africa.

Harlem Fashion Week Tickets

Harlem Fashion Week Goes to Africa

“Special Thanks to:

Eugene Adams, the Director of Collaborative Education at Bronx Community College, the American liaison of the Big Goree Project,

Stephanie Kane, Founder and Director of the Senegalese American Bilingual School

Mr. Sandaro Fame, our guide and educator at  SABS

Mamadou Adama Diop the Chief of Staff for the mayors office at Goree Island”

For More Information: info@harlemfw.com

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25Jan/17
hilary banks

Check out the “Hilary Banks” Music Video from Reign

hilary banksMeet a Real Hustle Bunny! Atlanta’s own singer/rapper/songwriter/producer Reign is a multi-talented artist who has had musical aspirations since the age of three. She prides herself in her work, setting herself apart with music that is uniquely her own. With the ability to play several instruments, write/arrange songs, and produce, Reign encompasses the total package. Currently writing, producing, and working on her solo album, Reign is on the move; with a unique, upbeat, pop sound she is ready to take the music industry by storm. hilary banks

 Reign has co-produced with platinum producers and wrote for upcoming Universal acts. Currently she is under her own label “Hustle Bunny Campaign” while still working with super producer Mr. Hanky pushing the club single “Hilary Banks.” Check it out for yourself!

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13Jan/17
Natoya

Taji Artist Lounge: Natoya P

Natoya PNatoya P created a collection of work that embodies her daily experiences as a woman. This body of work takes us through the present stages of life. She seeks to evoke emotions of heartbreak, love, bliss self-realization, and self-acceptance. She states that “many times society overlooks the inner evolution a woman goes through to attain self-actualization and become enough. We don’t take time to reflect on the journey we take to get to the point of self-love and acceptance. This collection takes us through that personal journey of a woman painting the pictures of the pages of a diary.” This is Natoya’s first formal collection and introduction to the world of art. Her work highlights the use of colors to depict the story on a canvas. Her dynamic pieces are multifaceted, showcasing various walks of life.

Natoya can be contacted by emailing natoyap@gmail.com for showings, interviews and inquires. | Natoya P Instagram

Natoya Natoya Natoya Natoya Natoya Natoya Natoya

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04Jan/17
Vernac

Celebrating our Heritage in Vernac!!!

Celebrating our Heritage in Vernac!Vernac

The everyday language spoken by people as distinguished from the literary language. Railways Cafe is of an indigenous building style using local materials and traditional methods of construction and ornament especially as distinguished from academic and historical architectural styles. Every country has its peculiar turns of phrase – quirks that give local languages flavor, color, and character. But unless you’re a native speaker, local slang can be tricky to grasp, let alone use. South Africa, with its 11 official languages, is blessed with a rich slang culture that can be quite daunting for foreign visitors – heck, even some residents flounder when faced with some of the more obscure lingo. “Heterogeneous We Are”

Railways Café, based in Irene Pretoria, is one of the most diverse restaurants enriched with culture and the spirit of UBUNTU.  On this day we celebrated the underground musicians that go unnoticed, yet produce the most powerful, rich sounds of Africa. People from all parts of the globe came through to honor these beautiful souls.Vernac

Vernac  Vernac

We spotted Mr Sibabalwenathi Mfabe, writer of Azania 1236″

The story of Azania continues in the year 1236 in the territory slightly south, and then into the north and its east in what we know today as KwaZulu Natal. In Azanian times no such place had existed at the time of the events that begun in 1234 and continued two years later. Here in these lands, lush and well vegetated, had been brought to order and control by the well liked custodian Cagn, under instruction and supreme protection of Tsui-Goab, Azania’s Arch Custodian. The book will be launched at one of the Taji Night’s book reading events soon.Vernac

“DO NOT SAY YOU WERE NOT WARNED”

 Vernac             Vernac             Vernac

All artwork sold is exclusively hand made to suit your individual desire by;

Sam

Biggie

Tendai

Felix

#Proudly African

Vernac Vernac Vernac

This wall is situated just outside the restrooms for individuals to write what they want to do to change the world. I found that very fascinating.

Vernac

“I want to change the world by always trying my best in everything I do and by being an outstanding ambassador for our nation, everywhere and under all circumstances, create an environment that will enable us to fulfill our vision of making our nation exceptional.” -Muhlez

“There is always something to do. There are hungry people to feed, naked people to clothe, sick people to comfort and make well. And while I don’t expect you to save the world I do think it’s not asking too much for you to love those with whom you sleep, share the happiness of those whom you call friend, engage those among you who are visionary and remove from your life those who offer you depression, despair and disrespect.” – Nikki Giovanni

Last month, Taji hosted an event to honour our Queens, and with that came a gift hamper sponsored by ShowbizAfrika, Muhlez Catering and Projects and Peo Information Technologies. This hamper went to the Queen who is and has always been the light in underprivileged communities, and selflessly so.

“My dream is to retire to my very own orphanage.”

Vernac Vernac

Vernac   Vernac

The children of Setlopo, a small village in Mahikeng north west of South Africa, hand printed this sheet in her honour.

Vernac

This woman has been sharing her income with communities for over twenty years, and has never asked for help doing so. We found that very touching and not to mention inspiring and heart-warming.

She carries five (5) degrees of different sectors, yet she chose to teach ONLY in rural settlements, because she believed it was her calling.

“YOU WILL NEVER INFLUENCE THE WORLD BY TRYING TO BE LIKE IT.”

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04Jan/17

Why I Cut My Hair: Black Girl Magic

Why I Cut My HairWhy I Cut My Hair: Black Girl Magic

When I decided to cut my hair two years ago, on October 3, 2014, the shortest I’d ever gone at the time, it was due to the excessive shedding I was experiencing. I was also looking forward to having a new look. I’d had the same style for the last decade and desperately wanted a change. I also wasn’t happy with the growing, and visible, specks of gray at the crown of my head.

Since cutting my hair, however, the versatility and self-awareness that came with it, gave me a sense Why I Cut My Hairof confidence that I’d never known before.

With the cut went the notion that a Black woman with little to no hair couldn’t still be beautiful and feminine at the same time. I know not everyone believes that, but growing up in a world where your beauty is defined by European standards, your sense of self can be non-existent.

Cutting my hair freed me of such a notion. For the first time, I began to see ME! The real me, what was under the hair. As my confidence grew, I became more playful and experimental with makeup and various short crops, highlights, whether curly, straight, natural and everything in between to accentuate my natural features. The standards that I’d grown to know as normal began to subside. I felt beautiful. Authentically beautiful. Just as I am and there was/is beauty in that.

I recently shared the above image with my Instagram followers with this statement:

“I use to think that having long hair was a beauty feature. Especially as a Black girl seeing perpetuated ideals of what it means to be beautiful. And to be considered a beautiful Black woman. Ironically I’ve never felt more beautiful after cutting all my hair off and going nearly bald. The best thing you can do for yourself is reject society’s definition of what’s beauty and find it in you. You already have everything in you. Imo short hair gives you versatility. And a big chop normally represents new birth/a new phase in your life. I’m ready ❤️”

To my surprise, there were many brown faces on my feed sharing their own thoughts on the matter, and expressing much of the same sentiments.

When I re-read that message, I recall the days in elementary school wanting my hair to be long and down my back like some of the other girls in my class. And along with it, lighter features: fairer skin and a straighter nose.

I don’t know how young or at what age I began to acquire these standards, and internalizing them as my own, but I am sure that they are the same ideals passed down from my mother, sister, grandmother, aunts, cousins, and friends. And it’s important for me now to break that cycle, so that I can pass down better messaging to my future daughter. To own her beauty and feel confident and enjoy every bit of this black girl magic.

What I also hope this message does for others, like myself, is help them in eradicating beauty standards that aren’t ideal or natural or maintainable. It’s important to understand that beauty comes in all forms, shapes, sizes and colors and, honestly, it starts with each one of us.

They say a woman who cuts her hair is getting ready to change her life. For me, that is exactly what happened. I changed my perspective and it reflected externally.

You won’t begin to see your physical beauty until you’ve tapped into your inner beauty, what makes you so unique, different and special. Loving you trumps any social standard of what you should look like and who you should be.

By: Antoinette “Ms. Toni” Warren
Ms. Toni is a Digital Media Influencer, Content Marketer and Founder of cottenkandi.com.
Twitter: @i_am_mstoni
IG: @iammstoni
FB: Facebook.com/iammstoni

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31Dec/16
Good Black Man x Africa Jackson

Good Black Man Profile: Nestle Snipes

A Good Black Man is Easy to FindGood Black Man x Collis Torrington

Today is bitter sweet. Bitter because this is our final #MustLoveBeards profile of 2016. Sweet because we are bringing back our Taji Mag crowd favorite: Nestle Snipes. This Good Black Man is the lead photographer of Made For a King Photography. A lot has happened since we last spoke with this bearded dapper gent.

Since our last encounter, Nestle Snipes recently shot 8-Time Olympic Track & Field Medalist & Fellow Jamaican Legend Veronica Campbell-Brown and Mr. Fly Malcolm X himself was once again featured in the Hunks 4 Hope calendar, and Made For a King photography has grown its client base. You might have caught a glimpse of our bearded brother on an episode of the breakout Netflix series Luke Cage.

We already know about his stunning portfolio and philanthropic work. This time, we want to look more closely at the man behind the lens.

Africa Jackson: Last time we spoke, it was such a meaningful conversation. It was great to learn about your work to stop domestic violence and your clearly superior artistic eye. We focused a lot on your business before, and now we want to focus more on you. What makes you happy?

Nestle Snipes: (smiles) A lot of things — a healthy bond with others, experiencing nature, laying in the grass, meditation, doing something meaningful with my hands. Giving gifts and seeing the recipient smile. Laughing — I love a good laugh. I enjoy partying. If people want to be jovial, I’m down. Spending time with my mom also makes me happy.

“Our potential is limitless.”

Good Black man x Tish Ferguson

AJ: Ok. You’re in film school, you volunteer, you’re an activist, you party, you run a successful business, you stay fly, and you let fans like me ask questions for 2 hours… but how do you take care of yourself?

Nes: Easy question. In the morning I have an hour of silence. Total hour of appreciation. Daily mantras are vital. I look at my vision board. When I come home, I listen to inspirational music with powerful frequencies: Afrobeat, electronica, jazz.

Taking care of myself also involves proper sleep. I want more people to realize that grown-ups are not exempt from naps.

AJ: Let mainstream media tell it, a good Black man is still hard to find. We know that is a myth, but in the midst of the negative energy thrown at yall, I want to know something. What is the greatest thing about being a Black man?

Nes: Our potential is limitless. We are often so revered and appropriated, but our resilience in uncanny. We convert sunlight into energy (metaphorically and literally).

AJ: So much of the miscommunication between Black men and Black women comes from lack of knowledge or lack of understanding. Black love is powerful and has the potential to grow even stronger. What is one thing you wish Black women knew about Black men to help cultivate that growth?

Nes: The Black man you interact with is only working with what he has at the moment. Don’t infringe on his freedoms based on your own desires. For example, getting work done is paramount for me at the moment. I don’t want to cheat myself or anyone else, so I may not pursue a woman. Please don’t say “all men” or “yall men”. We are trying. Don’t be disheartened by certain men who receive you wrong. Young Black boys deal with trauma that may stem from unresolved issues. Many of us had no clear definition of manhood.Photo Credit: Nestle Snipes + MFK Photography

“Little gestures mean a lot, yes, but I know it is not enough.”

AJ: What is one thing you wish you knew about Black women?

Nes: How can I be more of an ally beyond taking you out [to dinner]? How can we help? Little gestures mean a lot, yes, but I know it is not enough. We are at a loss without you telling us. The best way for Black women to communicate their needs to Black men is to do it without being condescending. Please don’t project the pain from other men onto us. In 2017 I want people to stop negative blaming and projecting insecurities. We have full autonomy. the transfer of energy matters.

“I want Black men to start protecting Black women.”

good Black men x Collis Torrington

Visit Made For a King Photography and Bearded Dapper Gents to learn more about the upcoming projects of this undeniably talented good Black man. You can also treat yourself by following him on Instagram, Facebook, and Pinterest. His new blog “Simply Snipes” is set for an early 2017 release.

Congratulations on your recent and continued success, Black man. We look forward to your next great project.

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20Dec/16
Myke Archie, WorkForce Comics

#MustLoveBeards Profile: Myke Archie

Get to know a brilliant emerging artist named Myke Archie

Happy #MCM Taji readers! Taji Mag is happy to introduce Myke Archie because we love his work & now you will too.

First of all, we’ve been fans for years. Myke Archie is the Perfect Man to buy a holiday gift from If you’re looking for a unique option this season. Check out our #MustLoveBeards profile features a down to earth Southern brother with a knack for creating beautiful works of art. He is the creator of WorkForce Comics who has been stirring up controversy all over social media. Today’s #MCM is a comic prodigy with a lot to say. His work has beeJ. Dilla x Myke Archien featured by Polite Conversation, All Real Radio, and now Taji Mag. Especially relevant is his drive to make economic autonomy a stronger part of how his fans live.

Graphic designer Myke Archie is on the rise. He illustrates book covers, album art, posters, and logos. This Atlanta native earned his BFA from Georgia State University. Consequently, he is not the biggest fan of traditional education. He prefers to think critically rather than follow trends. Perfect Man Designs, his privately owned company, has lots of fans. The first volume of his critically acclaimed series WorkForce Comics was released 2014. It looks at the crazy ways we think about life, making money, and politics while scratching and surviving in a society that cares more about loot than love.

Art x Myke Archie

His work has a certain quality that is not the same as other designers. The style, the stroke, and the scope is different than any comics out there. Other influences for his work include classics like Ice Cube’s film Friday and another favorite: old school Sci-Fi thriller called They Live. Myke invites fans to listen to his playlist of artists like Isaiah Rashad, Yani Mo, Denmark Vessey, and Knxwledge. The man something special.

#MustLoveBeards feature Myke ArchieMyke is part of the #BlackBusinessSelfie campaign via Nay Marie’s Black Owned Business Collective. He showed off several businesses including: Freedom Paper Company, Rooted-N-Nature, Dash Motor Oil, The HXLM Collective, and of course Taji Magazine!

Support Black Owned Business – Buy WorkForce Comics

WorkForce Comics Volume 4 is set to be released this month. Until then, customers can buy copies of volume 1, 2, 3, or all three on his blog: Perfect Man Designs. Like his fan page for the latest news and exclusive content. In conclusion, respect the man’s grind.

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19Dec/16
Queens Of Modern Times

Queens Of Modern Times is a Beautiful Coffee Table Book

Queens Of Modern TimesReines Des Temps Modernes (Queens Of Modern Times) is a Coffee Table Book reviving 10 African and Afro descendant heroins through women of our time, our century, thanks to poetry, photography, graphic and fashion design. Abla Pokou, Aminatou de Zaria, Anna Zingha, Seh Dong Hong Beh, Nandi, Makeda, La mĂ»latresse Solitude, Yaa Asantewa and NdatĂ© Yalah. All of these women made history but are still unknown by the majority. Each edition is translated in French, English, and Portuguese – three different ways to give birth to these heroines. More than a book, Reines Des Temps Modernes is a piece of art. Queens Of Modern Times is the mirror in which Black women realize their beauty and the power of their culture.

Queens Of Modern TimesPowered by Wendie ZAHIBO, the project was born in Brasil and explores the definition of a #QMT. A #QMT is a woman who wears her culture, her origin and her history as a crown, with pride, love and respect. More than that, it’s a woman who chooses to fight for her dreams. “Live your dreams, don’t dream your life.” This illustrated book puts the spotlight on 10 heroines through 10 women of the modern times in a voluptuous combination of art, prose and style. The goal is to show another side of our history, a history full of great women, conquerors, exchanges, and kingdoms. By putting the spotlight on 10 sheroes, QTM reveals 10 charismatic women, 10 conceptions of the Black beauties to the future readers, in order to help them consider their own crowns. Do you know who you are?

Available in Wood Hard Cover and a Softer Cover, Order your copy of Reines Des Temps Modernes today!

Queens Of Modern Times

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