Category Archives: Culture

10May/20
Abraham Adeyemi

South London Native, Abraham Adeyemi, Wins Best Narrative Short at Tribeca 2020

‘No More Wings does an absolutely wonderful job of taking a scenario that is extremely grounded and using the form to imbue it with an elevated sense of emotion and spirituality.’ – Barry Jenkins (Oscar-winning filmmaker)

Award-winning filmmaker, Abraham Adeyemi, adds another award for his short film “No More Wings.” The South London native won the award for Best Narrative at the 2020 Tribeca Film Festival. “No More Wings” is a short film about two friends at their favorite chicken restaurant who catch up on old times. The film is an exploration of their friendship, the difference in their life choices, and what the future may hold for each. What the audience discovers by the end of the film is shocking and in some cases relatable. Taji Mag was able to catch up with this promising filmmaker to discuss his prize-winning film. 

Dapper Dr. Feel (DDF): What inspired you to make this project? 

Abraham Adeyemi (AA): I grew up in South London and I was thinking about two of my friends from the area, I just thought to myself what would the experience be like if we met up today? The film was the opportunity to explore a place I call home and to see how people can have the same upbringing but turn out differently.

Abraham Adeyemi was mentored by Oscar-winning Sam Mendes and he shadowed him during the production of 1917.

DDF: The cut scenes to flashbacks were dope, is that meant to be reflective of how most people are when catching up with an old friend? 

AA: That was something I had on my mind. Everything in the moment, including their facial expression, explains what the moment means to them. There is definitely history happening within it. I definitely aim to get a sense of reminiscing. 

 DDF: How does it feel to be the only narrative short from the UK? 

AA:  I thought that it was crazy! Tribeca was the very first film festival we submitted the film to, we missed the deadline for the Sundance and some other film festivals. Just to know we got in blew me away. One day, I so happen to look through the catalog and thought to myself, “Wait a minute, there are no other Brit films. It’s funny because in advance I had been in contact with the British Film institution, they are responsible for being in contact with creatives going to the film festival. It was from there I discovered, “Oh my God, I am the only one on the list [from the UK]”. It really hit home how big an achievement it was to be at Tribeca. 

DDF: I loved how relatable this film is. Many Black people all over the world can relate. What has the response been to the film from people outside of the UK? 

AA: Besides Tribeca, not too many people from outside the UK have seen the film. I can only think of two who are Black who have seen the film. My friend and filmmaker Dream Hampton, who attended the Soho House premiere of the film in London in October, and Barry Jenkins, who was on the Soho House Script Judging panel, both at script stage and finished film.

Jury Comments: “It checked every box in terms of authenticity and heart and it was funny!” “It’s such an elegant piece of filmmaking.” 

DDF: How did you react to your win for Best Narrative Short”? 

AA: I never thought this would happen in my wildest dreams. In fact, I quite deliberately made sure I didn’t think about it. Quite a few of my friends had asked me “What do you get if you win? What happens if you win?” and things like that but I’m quite competitive. So I knew it was for the best too – rather than think about “if” I would win, to focus on just being grateful for the incredible achievement that was simply getting selected for Tribeca. It was, of course, the hope and ambition, I always strive for the top, but I was still very much shocked to have won, especially being my debut. In fact, I still am.

DDF: How did you celebrate your win? 

AA: Well, I found out a few days before it went public so I was sworn to secrecy. So on the day, I found out, I actually just celebrated alone in my room. Like, full-on, celebrated. Loud music, popped a bottle of prosecco… And then – just before it got announced to the world – I set up a surprise zoom call with a group of my closest friends with an elusive message “Zoom in an hour. Don’t ask questions. you won’t want to miss this. Bring a drink.” I don’t know who I thought I was… But it worked! It was really important to me that those people didn’t find out through social media. They’ve been massively important in my journey and I wanted to be able to enjoy this moment with them, before the chaos that would ensue once the world knew I had won. It has been non-stop calls, emails, and zoom meetings! I couldn’t be happier.

DDF: Given the film takes place in a restaurant, what are a few food spots a tourist should hit up in London? 

AA:  I would definitely recommend Morley’s because the chicken is good and it’s where I shot my film. It’s a well-know chicken spot like KFC. I would also recommend the Chicken Shop, the chicken is good but they have the best apple pie. I could go there to grab only an apple pie and go about my day.  The last restaurant I’d recommend would be Chuku’s, a Nigerian Tapas Restaurant (the first of its kind in the world!) where the sibling-duo that own it have their own original take on a number of familiar Nigerian dishes. I might be a little biased – because it’s owned by my friends – but I’ve been going since they started out with pop-ups and it’s been amazing to see them finally open their first permanent site earlier this year. Also, objectively, prior to COVID-19 enforcing a temporary close, every single night their reservations were fully booked! So they must be doing something right.”

Amid this COVID pandemic, Abraham Adeyemi is busy working on commissioned tv projects and an upcoming feature film project. Can he reach Barry Jenkins’s status? We’ll just have to keep a lookout for this award-winning creative. Keep up with him on Instagram at @abeislegend.

Angel Kaba

Angel Kaba is Teaching How She Made $1k in 4 Days

Angel Kaba is a dancer, choreographer, artistic director, movement coach, content producer, and digital marketer. Pre-COVID-19 Quarantine in New York City, she was a regular teacher at Alvin Ailey and Steps on Broadway and held regular workshops and rehearsals for multiple gigs. Within 24 hours, her whole life changed. Her schedule was wiped and she had to figure out how to survive and generate income. Taking all of her skills into account, she earned over $1000 in 4 days from teaching her classes online and is now hosting a course to teach you how you can teach online too.

Photo by Wheaton Simis

Taji Mag (TM): What was your teaching schedule like before the pandemic “quarantined” us into not gathering in groups?

Angel Kaba (AK): I was teaching 4 times a week in different studios in Manhattan and the Bronx. On top of my regular schedule, I had special Workshops, rehearsals, and other gigs like music videos and performances for festivals.

TM: How were you affected by the quarantine?

AK: OMG, in 24hours I felt like my life changed as if in a movie, but not for the good. Studios started to close one after another. I was in shock. I had no idea what to do. I am an immigrant here, I have an artistic visa for dance. Legally I can’t do anything other than dance. I thought, “How will I be able to make money and survive?”

TM: What did you do to overcome this hit to your income?

AK: After the shock, I was like, ok, let’s find a solution! I remembered Ashani Mfuko, the money maker of the dance industry who has been speaking about “passive incomes” for years. I researched to find the best way to teach online classes – which platform to use, the cost – then I put a 100% online strategy into place. In 4 days I made $1200!

TM: What are some items people can look forward to when taking your course?

AK: I brought my strength as a teacher and made my knowledge and expertise available for my students during this challenging time. 

To take Angel’s course, contact her via email at afrodancenewyork[@]gmail.com. Keep with with all of her endeavors on Instagram!

Taji Mag Vol 23 Golden Wisdom

Taji Vol23: Golden Wisdom

Release Jun 7 2020 | Vol23 of Taji is packed full of Black Beauty & Culture fulfilling its theme of Golden Wisdom! This volume’s cover features the #SlayBells of Adele Dejak’s Kenyan Photo Series entitled “Benson”. Gracing the pages are the Editor’s Pick, designer and tailor, T-MICHAEL; our Community Spotlight on Lovely Leo Skincare; our highlighted Hair Feature by Angela Plummer; “Solo Travel: Dance As A Passport with @Jasmine.Noir_” by dCarrie; “Earthiopia” by Jashua Sa’Ra; “#BlackLoveConvo: New Comedy, Twenties, Aims To Stand Strong on the Shoulders of Living Single” by Dapper Dr. Feel; “Help the Children Move in a Time of Stillness” by Janelle Naomi; Our Vol 23 theme “Golden Wisdom;” Fitness Highlight, “Ernestine Shepherd is Still Bodybuilding at the Age of 83”; Vegan Fun with Earth’s Pot’s Jerk Portabella Toast; “I Am Maathmatics” Book Series; “Nicholas Brooklyn is a Necessary Community Staple;” Featured Art Piece by Craig Carter; Comic Appreciation with “Monarchs” by Joshua Bullock; Black Business Highlights; and more!!

Purchase your copy now at ‘Shop Taji’!

Taji Mag Vol 23 Golden Wisdom

Purchase Taji Mag | Vol 23

Taji Mag is the epitome of the positive Black experience – elevating Black brands, narratives, and imagery. We embody the traditional and modern royalty of Pan-African people via our quarterly digital and print publication and live events.

22Apr/20
BlackAF

#BlackAF is Barely a Black-ish Carbon Copy

I am always rooting for black creatives and try my best to support them, but in this case, I would be doing a disservice if I did not give my honest review of #BlackAF. Famous producer/writer Kenya Barris delivered a series that lacks the lure and realism of his other successful projects. Don’t get me wrong, I like Black-ish and a few other of Barris’s projects but this series fits into the category of “Nah, I’ll pass.” 

“The very definition of ‘blackness’ is as broad as that of ‘whiteness,’ yet we’re seemingly always trying to find a specific, limited definition.” – Issa Rae 

Acting Be Like…

I understand the series is loosely based on the life of Kenya Barris, but I find it hard to believe that Black wealthy people act like this… Maybe my opinion is influenced by the fact that I only personally know a handful of wealthy Black people. Out of those Black people, none of them act like the family in #BlackAF. If there is a family that exists as the one portrayed, I am pretty sure they would not be as extreme. 

I do like the moments where the family supports each other whenever an outsider tries to attack, like with the white couple in the first episode. Besides a few moments within the first few episodes, there are not many moments I find relatable or compelling to finish the first season.  

Because Dialogue 

As I have become introduced to the screenwriting world, the most daunting task as a screenwriter is writing dialogue. All the top screenwriters have agreed that mastering dialogue is very difficult, so I can imagine writing the dialogue of Black people can pose as an obstacle.

Still, I don’t know any Black people that talk the way the characters talk. I assume the approach is to be as authentic as possible but there needs to be a bit of adjustment. The way in which Kenya talks to his assistant is definitely not believable. If that is the case, that person is a terrible human being.  

“ Contemporarily, we struggle with people worried about representation sometimes. It’s a burden, as artists, that we take on that limits the work. It limits the characters people play. It limits the roles they want to do.” – Dee Rees

The Barris Act or Lack There Of…

From the very beginning of episode one, I became annoyed with Barris’s acting and just found his performance to be too whiny. I understand the character is frustrated with stereotypes and wants to be seen for who he is, but there is a better way to portray this. Take Al Bundy for example, Ed O’Neil portrays him as whiny at times but not to the point where he becomes annoying. 

I think Barris could’ve easily picked someone else to play the character better and with a more compelling delivery. Similar to the way he chose Anthony Anderson to play the father on Black-ish. In all honesty, I think that is what makes Black-ish a more watchable show. The actors that portray the characters in Black-ish, combined with the writing, make Black-ish great. 

In the end, #BlackAF is a rated R version of Barris’s hit show Black-ish, just not as engaging. I wish I could speak differently considering the amount of backlash #BlackAF got last year during one of its first showings. There’s wishful thinking that the series will improve and become the next big hit for the Black culture. I hope that the Black community continues to get opportunities to show diversity within the culture and share stories many people can relate to, vanishing the stereotypes place upon the Black community. Watch for yourself on Netflix.

14Apr/20
Black Honey Toys

Black Honey Toys is Brand for Adult Toys That Look Like You

Black Honey Toys (BHT) is an online adult shop which specializes in sex toys and other erotic products that reflect Black sexuality and skin tones. In an industry dominated by mainstream Eurocentric standards of beauty, BHT has created a unique retail space with their carefully selected inventory and their mission to provide a retail experience which makes shoppers feel empowered and represented.

”Black people – both singles and couples of all sexual orientations, enjoy shopping for sex toys just as much as any other group but the retail experience often leaves people feeling less valued,” says Mac Arthur, Co-Founder and CEO of Black Honey Toys.

“Seeing yourself reflected in your retail experience can be empowering and uplifting; just as the scarcity of products which reflect you and your values can have the opposite effect. We are championing the idea that online sex toy shops should be more racially inclusive in their store displays and product range.”

Black Honey ToysBlack Honey Toys is here for you – whether you are a Black person looking for pleasure enhancing toys which reflect your skin color or you are of any other color and have a particular preference for such toys.

Shop online now via their website! Follow on both Instagram and Twitter!

01Apr/20

Panama Jackson on His Four Favorite Women Authors and Being Unapologetically Black

Panama Jackson

“People are not looking for [our] articles, they are looking for me and Damon Young when they read Very Smart Brothas,” explained Panama Jackson, co-founder of Very Smart Brothas, about people who ask to be in the publication in order to gain some notoriety. I have been an avid reader of the blog and The Root column (also partnered with Very Smart Brothas) for a while now. After meeting Jackson at a few events, I knew it was time to feature him in Taji Mag. 

The first time I heard about Very Smart Brothas, I was talking to another freelance writer at the 2018 African American Black Film Festival in Miami. She suggested I read their published works and I found myself pre-occupied with doing so on my flight back to DC. The first article I read was Panama’s “So It Turns Out ‘Electric Boogie,’ the Song Your Mama ’nem Electric Slide To, Is About a Vibrator. Life Is Different Now.” It was then I knew I had a couple of writers I could look forward to reading and, hopefully one-day, meeting. My list now included the Very Smart Brothas and Jemele Hill, but that’s a feature for another day. Stay tuned! Wink wink.

Me and You, Your Mama and Panama’s Book Too! 

Panama Jackson is known for his hilarious blogs that cover everything from family political debates to film and book reviews. He is also known to post his monthly book list which is typically composed of some of his favorite women writers, including the following:

  • Zora Neale Hurston. Well-known Black writer and essayest, some of her work has been released posthumously like Barracoon: The Story of the Last Black Cargo and Hitting a Straight Lick with a Crooked Stick: Stories from the Harlem Renaissance.

  • Nafissa Thompson Spires. Known for her multiple award-winning book, Heads of the Colored People: Stories.

  • Toni Morrison. Jackson mentions he has a love-hate relationship with her stating “Some of her work is brilliant, her work is not an easy lift, but I am a person that appreciates an easy lift in reading. It’s not that I can’t understand what’s happening but sometimes it’s just difficult to weigh through it.”

  • Samantha Urby. He stated, “She is a great essayist and I cannot do what she does. I could try, but I just can’t.”

  • Bassey Ikpi. Jackson stated, “Her newest book I’m Telling the Truth But I’m Lying: Essays is one of the best books I have read in my life. Off the strength of one album (book), she makes my list!”

Jackson’s colleague, Damon Young, has published a book titled, What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Blacker. When asked about his personal book deal, Jackson responded, “I am looking to have my own book out one day, it will be titled Elevators because the book will be about me and you, your mama and your cousin too!” (If you don’t know, the title is a nod to the legendary Hip-Hop group, OutKast, and their early chart topper entitled Elevators). Jackson talked about his ideal book which would include things like parenting, how Hip-Hop is tied to his masculinity, and a few other areas of his life. His goal is to explain how music and entertainment have shaped him as a man and as a human being. 

In the Words of Nas, “Keep Integrity at Every Cost.”

Panama Jackson

Very Smart Brothers Founders Panama Jackson and Damon Young at The Root Gala

Being asked to review films for other popular platforms, Panama speaks on the importance of maintaining integrity when taking on commissioned pieces. One instance he recalls was when a notable publication asked him to write a review of Cardi B’s song Bodak Yellow and the cultural significance of the song. Jackson wrote the piece and turned it in, but the publication did not like his review. They wanted something more “culturally sound.” He recalls, “I had to leave the money on the table, I just thought Bodak Yellow was a great song. Cardi B killed it and that was it. I wasn’t going to force-feed this idea to their white audience that there was cultural significance in the song. It’s just good music and Black people make good stuff.”

He went on to talk about how he felt Black culture gets short-changed in the most popular publications. He used last year’s Jidenna album, 85 to Africa, as an example. “I read a lot of reviews on that album because I loved it so much. I really didn’t see anyone do the album real justice, so I told myself that I had to. Most reviews I saw were 200 words or less. I wrote 1500 words because I felt it needed context and as much effort as possible since I didn’t see it happening anywhere else.”

“Those that don’t got it, can’t show it. Those that got it, can’t hide it.” – Zora Neale Hurston

Panama Jackson: From Black Bloggin to Very Smart Brothers

Panama explained the process it took to get to where he is now as a writer and even talked about his improvement along the way. “If I could give my younger self advice, I would tell myself to be more thoughtful and not be so hell-bent on a hot take. Back ten years ago, if I had an idea, I was willing to defend it to the ends of the earth and that’s not the way to be. This definitely took longer for me to learn than it should have.”

Jackson went on to explain his most significant growth as a writer stating, “I have also become Blacker in my writing. Very rarely you will see me write about white people. I have not done that for years and it’s something you would not notice unless you are actively paying attention. I write about Black people, Black experiences, and that’s it. My writing has become intentionally unapologetically Black.”

Panama Jackson talked about how lucky he and Damon were to make Very Smart Brothas as big as it is now. “It was timing. We started during the Black blogger’s scene and were lucky to build from there. It’s kind of like Jay-Z’s albums presently. If he comes out now, I don’t think he matters. But because he’s been around for so long, when he does put out an album now, people pay attention.” Jackson said he and Damon wrote everyday about their thoughts and opinions. From there they were able to build a fan base. 

As we practice social distancing and quarantine ourselves during this Coronavirus pandemic, I recommend you head over to Very Smart Brothas to find some entertaining articles and videos to help pass the time. Jackson has also done a podcast called “What If Tyler Perry Had a Writer’s Room” which can be heard on SoundCloud and Spotify. The first episode features one of his favorite female writers, Bassey Ikpi, as they discuss Perry’s Netflix feature A Fall From Grace. Check it out and don’t forget to stay safe during these rough times.

Panama Jackson

22Mar/20

“Self Made” is a Colorful and Entertaining Look at Madam CJ Walker’s Life

MADAM CJ WALKER

Netflix’s “Self-Made: Inspired by the Life of Madam C.J. Walker” is an introduction to one of the most celebrated Black female business owners in history, Sarah Breedlove. This project is directed by Kasi Lemmons (Harriet) and Demane Davis (Queen Sugar). NBA Superstar, LeBron James, and businessman, Maverick Carter, have joined the project as Executive Producers. Taji Mag was able to check out the series before its release on March 20th and here’s the review. 

Visuals

Once again Kasi Lemmons has provided the audience with the vision of a powerful Black woman taking on a form that transcends reality. In this instance, whenever Sarah has a vision of or is faced with adversity, the audience is presented with colorful dance routines, mocking female logos, and even a boxing match with her adversary, Addie Monroe (I assume this character is based off of Annie Malone). I really found the boxing scenes with Addie to be quite enjoyable. I also found myself waiting to see Sarah give Addie a one-hitter quitter for her trifling ways. 

Octavia Spencer as Madam C.J. Walker and Carmen Ejogo as Addie Monroe

*Spoilers Ahead*

The Walker girl logo that mocked Sarah (and was created by Sarah’s husband, C.J. Walker) was also an interesting concept. It paid off in the end when we learned that the Walker girl was not only designed by C.J. but it was also his ideal woman. This is discovered towards the end of the series when C.J. cheats on Sarah with Dore Larrie.

Performances

Octavia Spencer does an amazing job of portraying one of the most celebrated Black entrepreneurs. She was able to capture the excitement in her facial expressions whenever an idea manifested. Spencer also was convincing when her character was met with doubt or fear, a prime example is whenever she was haunted by her past self with “bad hair”. 

Tiffany Haddish also did pretty well as Leila, the daughter of Sarah. I found it very interesting how the character’s liberal lifestyle was introduced to the audience. It made me want to research Leila’s entrepreneurial success with her business, The Dark Tower, in New York.

Kevin Carroll as Ransom was a standout to me in the series. His performance as Madam C.J. Walker’s legal advisor had very compelling moments. I wasn’t really familiar with his work but, after viewing the series, a thorough Youtube and Google search went underway. I just had to see his other accomplishments.

Another notable character was Ransom’s cousin, Sweetness, played by Bill Bellamy. This role was well written and was a great example of “don’t judge a book by its cover.” Sweetness can be seen as a smart conman who always sought out a quick buck, but in reality he was a man of integrity who only wanted to make it in the world legally. We learn this at the end of the series when Ramson explains his demise. 

Gender Roles

Before recalling what I’d already known about C.J. Walker, I was feeling the support he was giving his wife: uprooting his life with Sarah and moving to a whole different city to help support her haircare business. I bet it was seen as very impractical at the time, but nonetheless he did and they were successful. Toxic masculinity and society’s infatuation with the lighter complexion existed heavily during the 1900s. I’m sure this greatly influenced his decision to cheat on Sarah; however, it doesn’t give him a pass to do so. Blair Underwood did a great job of portraying C.J., then again he always does a great job of portraying the conniving, cheating husband (i.e. Madea’s Family Reunion).

Unity Over Racism 

Blair Underwood as CJ Walker, Octavia Spencer as Madam CJ Walker and Kevin Carroll as Ransom.

This series explores racism, colorism, and gender discrimination in a thought-provoking manner. I kept thinking to myself, what if I was trying to build a business for haircare in the world Madam C.J. Walker lived in? Not only was racism still a major issue at the time, but to fight within my own race about my gender and skin color? Talk about hurdling obstacles! The series really provided some in-depth perspective on how difficult it was to achieve what Madam C.J. Walker did. Seeing the pain she had to go through was quite an eye-opening experience. 

The death of Sweetness (played by Bill Bellamy) gave a sense of closure for Sarah and her rival, Addie Monroe. It made the characters reflect on their biggest threat: racism and gender discrimination, not each other. Sweetness’ lynching was touching, to say the least, as the Director gave the audience first perspective scenes that can only be described as heart-wrenching. 

Conclusion

“Self Made: Inspired By The Life of Madam C.J. Walker” is a beautifully told story. The creatives in charge did a great job of pacing the story and supplying just enough conflict to make the viewer want to binge-watch the whole series on a Sunday night. I am glad I was able to speak with Kasi Lemmons about this project and I thoroughly enjoyed watching the series. I highly recommend giving it a watch. Of course it’s not completely accurate; however, it’s still very entertaining. While we celebrate women’s month at this time when self-distancing is in place, this Madam C.J. Walker series will allow the viewer four hours to escape the current troubles of the world. 

Academy Award® winner, Octavia Spencer, stars as Madam C.J. Walker, the trailblazing African American haircare entrepreneur who was America’s first female self-made millionaire. Inspired by the book, On Her Own Ground, written by Walker’s great-great-granddaughter, A’Lelia Bundles, the Netflix original series “SELF MADE: INSPIRED BY THE LIFE OF MADAM C.J. WALKER”  brings the uplifting story of this cultural icon to the screen for the first time. Against all odds, Walker overcame post-slavery racial and gender biases, personal betrayals, and business rivalries to build a ground-breaking brand that revolutionized black haircare, as she simultaneously fought for social change.

17Mar/20
coronavirus

Coronavirus: Providing Solutions, Not Panic, to Survive COVID-19

Let’s use social media to create solutions for the Coronavirus, not panic. [From Taji’s Editor]

• Introvert? Cool, we got this, just make sure you’re stocked.
• Extrovert? Is there someone you can stay with or who can stay with you? A staycation with the squad maybe?
• Are there elders, disabled folks, struggling families, etc in your neighborhood who you can grab extra groceries for?
• Any homeschoolers with lesson plans/activities/advice for parents at home with their children?
   – Kibibi Oyo will be giving free 15 min consultations to parents who want advice and a plan for their children to learn at home. She has both paid and free options that she can share. Just need to hit me up and schedule the FREE consultation. Schedule appointments here: https://professoroyo.as.me
 – Tamykah Anthony homeschools her children and has activities, printables, cool science experiments, etc. to complete with the little ones. She has also posted how to safely make your own cleaning products and hand sanitizer:
coronavirus    –
 Keisha Ragfitness provided this activity sheet:
coronavirus• Any child sitters willing to take on multiple children while some parents are still required to work (or who just need a break to prepare)?
* In light of the Gabriel Fernandez series and a status Will read to me, please keep an eye out for abused children whose only escape was school but are now forced to be home with their abusive guardian(s) all day.
• via MLN8NG: “As we are all aware, Coronavirus has been causing quite an impact on us economically, especially people of color who rely on 9-5 jobs as well as entrepreneurs; however, this does not have to be the case. We can start alleviating some of the felt pressures of the pandemic by very small steps.
In our research, we have learned that most people are having issues with child care services, hospice, online learning, and finding various tasks and activities to do while indoors. A potential solution lies within us. If you or someone you know, can provide childcare services or any other online learning services, take the time to set up a free or paid ticket event on MLN8NG so that we may be able to spread the information out and have a central location for Black and Brown faces to find options and alternatives in this growing online space. 
You can be of great impact to how we as a community both transition and expand within this new structuring. Take some time, gather your skillset(s) that you can offer and share them with us and spread the word. We would like to begin assisting with building a central location for people to gather information that can facilitate start and end dates, customers, as well as, and most importantly, those offering services. 
No skill is too big or too small. Do you stream classes? Do you stream gaming? Can you setup house visits and information teaching safety measures or stream them online? Are you a daycare provider? Anything you can do, place your information on the site so we can promote it and provide to our community. Simply click on the register button below and create an account on the site and then submit your event/stream/availability. Your friends, family, and those whose lives you will impact are already thanking you for it.”
• via Cory Ant: Buy stuff that will help your immune system and stuff that will last in case our country gets crazy and makes people stay in, instead of stocking up on cookies and meat products. Buy FRUITS like apples and oranges, VEGETABLES, GINGER, things that will be beneficial to your health and fighting off the coronavirus.
• Holistic Wellness advice from The Laya Center can be read at https://www.thelayacenter.com/blog/2020/3/16/elder.
Namaskar is also providing great products to boost your immune system fend off coronavirus, cancer, lupus, diabetes, high blood pressure, and more.
• via Krystal: Check on new moms who may need breastmilk/formula due to people stockpiling who may not be able to produce on their own.
• If you work/shop at a grocery/convenience store and notice necessities are restocked, make a post so people know where to go.
• via Jocelyn Sewell: While water is essential, people may want to purchase filters or filtered water bottles. Water can be found anywhere and with a filter, it’s drinkable.
Feel free to add solutions for the coronavirus in the comments. 🖤

16Mar/20
hits the fan

Sometimes Sh*t Hits The Fan and That’s Okay

Yes, sometimes shit hits the fan and it IS okay. It could be something simple like someone bumps into you and readjusts your mood or something bigger like being short on bills for the month. Either way, we have to remember that we are allowed to feel how we need to at that moment as long we don’t cause harm to ourselves or anyone else. Sometimes we need to be sad, or angry, or depressed, or unmotivated to make the ride back to elated, or joyful, or inspired feel that much better.

hits the fanLife is full of rollercoasters. Highs and lows will be bountiful and, in some cases, day-to-day. Though our experiences are unique, especially when you add perspective into the equation, we are rarely the only ones experiencing something or who have experienced something. Self-love has become a catch-phrase but it rarely includes the achievement steps because they look different for everyone. It could be helpful to seek support. Support can come from family or strangers. It can be in-person or online. It can be through a book or a video. It can be therapy. Black people across the globe are raving about how therapy has improved their lives. Check with Therapy for Black Girls and Black Therapists Rock for leads. If you can afford it, take a few days off to self-reflect without bashing yourself. Analyze where you are, where you want to be, and at least one actionable step you can take.

Whatever you do, don’t fully give up on yourself. Take a mental break. Be kind to yourself. Do what you can with what you have. Make small achievable goals that lead to larger goals, always giving yourself room to adjust and reset if need be. When shit hits the fan, whether in our control or not, we always control how we respond to it. We can make it okay.

12Mar/20
travel n shit

A Simple Exercise in Broadening Your Views on Travel

When you think of travel, what do you see? Beaches, mountains, hiking, sunbathing and all the things we tell ourselves we’re too busy to do regularly at home? We’ve entered a new year and a new decade folks! Consider that it may be time to welcome in a new mindset on what is considered travel.

Let me start by making the task easy on you; don’t consider what isn’t travel. Broaden your idea of what is travel and I guarantee you can go further. The amount of time it takes you to get from one place to the next is indeed called “travel time” is it not? For me, the difference in traveling to the city for work and traveling to a foreign country is my level of familiarity with the destination. I could happily do without riding the train or sitting on an airplane – in both instances the commute is simply the necessary evil. Consider someplace closer than a country 8+ hours away may provide you a similar or even greater level of unfamiliarity and excitement as a city across an ocean and a sea. Either way, you’re traveling! Give yourself the credit!  The only difference is the distance. Don’t let the distance of a location blind you to the benefits of experiencing every new destination as robustly as possible.

I offer you the opportunity to be mindful in and of the experiences you’re having away from home. On my podcast Travel N Sh!t, I, along with my guests, discuss what we experience while we’re abroad and how often mundane and routine experiences may be enriched or experienced differently when viewed through the lens of travel. Through these conversations, I’ve developed a distinct appreciation for what I gain from my time spent in new environments. I loooove wandering around cities I at one time never considered on my radar of places I’d be able to see before I got BIG RICH. Little did I know, I’d become “BIG RICH” from opening my mind to the incredible experiences I’m able to have in ANY destination, near or far. You don’t have to travel far to go far.

Be sure to check out the conversations my guests and I have on Travel N Sh!t every Thursday wherever you listen to your podcasts.

Visiting a new state, or even a new destination in a state you’ve already been to can be very similar to visiting a different city in a country that’s new to you.

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