Category Archives: General

31Jul/16
Kearabetswe Setlhare

Lindi Roaming the Streets Highlights Kearabetswe Setlhare

Evaluate, Educate and Express the dynamic lineage of Ancient African Royalty!!! Who is Kearabetswe Setlhare?

Kearabetswe Setlhare

She refers to herself as the girl next door, who loved dressing her dolls and playing in her mom’s closet. Staying true to that today, “I am an accessible, affordable, qualified fashion designer.”

After completing her fashion design studies at LISOF, she decided to go straight into creating “House of Khalid” which is a family brand founded by herself, co-owned by her sister and mother. They focus mostly on the administrative photography and sales side of the business, while she manages the creative direction as the head designer.

“When I initially started, the brand only had one label, Khalid Couture, that was in 2011, and today, House of Khalid is a fashion brand that houses three labels namely Khalid Couture, Bow & Arrow Accessories, and Khalid Kids.”

Kearabetswe Setlhare Kearabetswe Setlhare

The name House of Khalid means House of “Eternity” in Ancient Egyptian.

The concept behind the label is to promote everything that distinguishes us as Africans be it textured fabrics, loud print, bold and bright colours and the beautiful lushness of the African continent, and its people. “We intend to bring uniqueness and individuality to a world otherwise ruled by fashion clones.”

Kearabetswe SetlhareKearabetswe Setlhare

Kearabetswe Setlhare Kearabetswe Setlhare Kearabetswe Setlhare

FB:@Rabi Setlhare

IG:@house_of_khalid

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25Jul/16
Afro Goddess

The Diary of An Afro Goddess is a Must See 1-Woman Show

Afro GoddessThe 12 performance run of The Diary of An Afro Goddess, a fresh, new unapologetic, dynamic one-woman show in NYC, started July 21 and runs until August 5, 2016.  Cherie Danielle created and stars in a cutting edge play.

Synopsis:
Isis, the Afro Goddess is not only a Goddess, but she is also the main source of entertainment at “The Goddess Lounge”, a special place between heaven and earth, for those who need an extra boost of self-transitioning to the next dimension. But the only person who seems to need an extra boost is Isis herself, which leaves her audience questioning, how did she become an Afro Goddess? Experience her journey from her hair to her career as an artist; from her beginnings of being born in 1950s Birmingham, Alabama to falling in love; to self love. Witness her transformation as it unfolds through text, humor, drama, poetry, song and multiple characters.

10% of all ticket sales and contributions will be donated to Blackdiaries.org

Written & Performed by Cherie Danielle
Directed by Mariska Phillips

 

Shows & times:
Sunday July 24th @3pm
Weds July 27th @8pm
Thurs July 28th @8pm
Friday July 29th @8pm
Saturday July 30th @8pm
Sunday July 31st @3pm
Weds August 3rd @8pm
Thurs August 4th @8pm
Friday August 5th @8pm

Note that a limited amount of tickets are available online. Tickets are also available at the door.

Get your tickets now here!

Afro Goddess

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16Jul/16
Art 2 Activism

Art 2 Activism Brings Creatives Together for Awareness

Art 2 ActivismArt 2 Activism, hosted by Nasir and Sassy of Art 2 Ink and presented by Art 2 Ink & The Shade Room, cultivated awareness of the problems plaguing our community. Art 2 Ink, a tattoo studio at it’s core, covered its walls with art from featured artists such as @TheOneWillFocus and @CocaineandCaviar. Live Performances were given by the powerful @Mal.Mero of @NYCUnity and energetic @_AlexPhoenix. Donations were collected at the door for the International Youth Leadership Institute. Throughout the evening, video clips of controversial, yet pertinent, discussions looped on the tv, including a special message from The Shade Room.

When we’re being slain in the the streets, it’s important for us to commune and heal. The energy was felt. We look forward to the next installment.

Art 2 Activism

Flip through the photos for a glimpse of the magic that occurs when our people are in one space emitting positivity. Photos by NayMarie for Taji Mag and budding 11 year old artist, Sean Jaiden.

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12Jul/16
African Rhythm

Lindi Roaming the Streets Highlights South African Band “African Rhythm”

In this edition of Lindi Roaming the Streets, Lindi highlights South African Band “African Rhythm.”

Celebrating our Youth

“When you hit a wrong note, it’s the next note that makes it good or bad.”

Miles Davis.

 

African Rhythm is a percussion band that performs a combination of Afro Soul and Tribal House music. This young band chose to make a good note…

African Rhythm

“We are from Krugersdorp, South Africa and a fresh approach to the healing properties of African Music”

African Rhythm 

African Rhythm

They find this very appropriate as their main aim is to Unite and Heal through music. This team has been friends for 10 years, and decided at some point to start a group that fused music, fashion and dance. “Music was not always readily available, so we started playing African instruments to make our own rhythms to dance to. This led to the formation of our band.”

Music unites”

African Rhythm

*Bongane “Bongs” Vuso

*Thabang “Nikki Nak” Motsoahae (Shakers)

*Kamogelo “Youngman” Tshabangu (Percussionist)

*Tebogo “T.B.Z” Mabe (Percussionist)

*Katlego “K.Tee” Mathakeng (Xylophone)

* Vusi “Mavara” Mathule (Percussionist)

*Letlhogonolo “Mafa” Motshetshedi (Percussionist)

*Nthabiseng ”Nthabie” Sentso(Vocalist)

*Kutlwano ”Kaytee” Lubeko(Dj&Fashion

*Tshepo “Jozi” Mokgosi (Percussionist, Leader)

Their achievements include being featured in big music festivals such as:

  • Go West Festival in the Westrand
  • Jazz on the Lake at Zoo Lake
  • 99% Local Music in Randfontein
  • Donaldson Dam Annual Picnic Explosion in Westonaria

“We spent Earth Hour 2016 performing for the mayor of Pretoria, Kgosientso Ramokgopa and various other dignitaries.

We have also been featured on “Skyroom Live” on SABC1 and won Brenda Fassie’s 10year Legacy Competition in 2014.

Thus far our biggest highlight has been performing at Dr Yusuf Dadoo Hospital in Krugersdorp, for World AIDS Day in 2014 and 2015. These performances solidified our belief in the healing power of our music as even the bedridden patients at the hospital got up to dance.

We have always believed in our talent but this became more apparent when our Facebook video went viral on 3 April 2016. Having achieved more than 900,000 views in 1 week, we have decided to dedicate the next few months to satisfying the overwhelming local demand for our live performances.

We are currently based in Pretoria and have been booked for events in Gauteng and the surrounding provinces, namely North West, Free State and Limpopo (MP, we are ready for you).”

“In the future, we want to elevate South African music by touring abroad and establishing fashion, music, and dance schools in under privileged areas in South Africa.”

 

This man is a living testament of what a father is.

African Rhythm

“When I met African Rhythm they had been staying with Katlego’s Uncle for about 2 weeks.

About a week later they called that they needed to see me. Jozi, Nik Nak and Katlego came to see me and explained that their families were not too happy about them leaving home. Their Uncle approved and was willing to continue accommodating them but they didn’t want to be the cause of a rift between the Uncle and the rest of the families. So they asked if they could stay with me.

It was nearly month end and I thought we would be able to find a place for them before the end of the month but that proved to be a very difficult task.

No agency would allow 10 people to move into one place so we had to find a place being rented directly by the owner. We eventually managed to find a place 2 months later.

Finances come from multiple sources:

– Some of their parents send them a little money monthly.

– The money they get from performing and sometimes busking (when things get really bad)

– I handle the shortfalls

African Rhythm

“I have an agreement with them to get a certain percentage of their performance fees but I haven’t taken a single cent yet. They just can’t afford it. Feeding, housing, and transporting 11 people is very costly.

What we need to resolve this is more gigs. They have been getting a lot of publicity and requests but very few gigs (averaging a gig a week).”

To book them or for more information visit @african_rhythm!

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07Jul/16
vENv

vENv is Spreading Love Through His Words

We were introduced to vENv at the always dope Sehiii (“Pronounced Say-Hi, don’t forget the third eye”) in Brooklyn, NY. “Simply put, Victor ‘vENv’ Arumemi is a creator. A multi-hyphenate (I promise, it’s a real word) who believes in the power and purpose of bringing the things that lie within the imagination to life. Whatever the medium may be, art is all around us and it should be embraced and experienced by every soul, starting with yours.” Watch the videos below for a sneak peek into vENv’s artistry. Check out his instagram @venvthetrbldhrt and soundcloud for whole shebang!
image2a
Photos by Tyrell Gittens
@unscripted_moments

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07Jun/16
Chef Delliz Hazell

Chef Delliz Hazell is Proving Vegan Cuisine is Easy & Appetizing!

Chef Delliz HazellA career in food came naturally to Chef Delliz Hazell…

As a child she spent a lot of time between the family owned bakery and their orchard compound which housed an inn. Many weekends were spent at seaside and the farmers markets with her grandmother, culling through fresh produce and picking through the daily catch brought in by local fisherman. Unbeknownst to her, these experiences would be the impetus for her love of local, farm-to-table and seasonal cuisine.

During her high school years, Hazell began to formally develop her culinary skills by joining her High school Culinary club. There she excelled, joining C-CAP program and participating in culinary competitions in and around New York City. In college, while working on her Hospitality & Culinary degree, Hazell immersed herself in food, culture and community outreach. Her love for local  farm-to-table continued. She helped launch and presided over the cooks in the market club, working with the NYC green market doing live cooking demonstrations for the community using farm fresh produce. Eventually she combined her love of outreach and food by spearheading an alliance with the club and a local shelter to cater events for mothers in need.

She joined, and still volunteers with, Spoons Across America on the dinner party project working with Chef Fili and the Gracie mansion culinary team to educate inner-city kids about the joys of cooking fresh as well as dinner party planning. She’s also worked with the A.I.W.F’s Days of taste as a visiting classroom chef. In addition, Hazell has participated in the IHMRS competition at Jacob Javits and received awards from the Societé Culinaiere de Philantripique and a scholarship award for community outreach from Debragga Spitler.

Upon Graduation Chef Hazell spent a few years in Atlanta, Georgia and started a small baking company that specialized in custom cakes. Upon receiving a few job offers in New York, she decided to move back home and began working in the corporate food sector. Although she gained a lot of experience, Chef Hazell decided to ultimately venture out on her own and become self-employed as a full-time private chef specializing in local farm-to table cuisine and cooking with the seasons.

Chef Hazell is a longtime member of the American Institute of Wine and Food (AIWF), as well as the American Culinary Federation (ACF) and the James Beard foundation. She still has a heart for outreach and continues to volunteer her time and skills to both adults and kids alike, at schools, clinics, community centers, or anywhere she is needed. Most of Hazell’s clients are based in NYC and the Hamptons.

Chef Delliz HazellMost recently, Chef Delliz Hazell has partnered with Taji Mag to highlight the fine art yet ease of vegan cooking. It is popular, especially in America, to cook with meat and dairy, but this recent migration to healthier eating has created a demand for vegan cuisine. Most people who are transitioning have the most trouble because they are unfamiliar with how easy and fun vegan cuisine can be.

For Vol 7 of Taji Mag Chef Hazell created a quick vegan “spaghetti and meatballs” that is also free of gluten and soy. For the ingredients and recipe, grab your copy of Vol 7 and flip to page 19! For more on Chef Delliz Hazell and more fresh food tips, visit her website at www.dellizhazell.com and follow her on IG @chefdellizhazell!
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29May/16
DanceAfrica 2016

A Taste of DanceAfrica 2016!

DanceAfrica 2016: The photos say it best. DanceAfrica always brings out the most beautiful melanated beings of all ages and eccentricities. The festival has tons of Black Owned vendors and the actual DanceAfrica show held at BAM is cultural significant, magnificent, and necessary!!

NayMarie Photography for Taji Mag
Featured image: Models for Red Room Luxe Salon at OMhh | Hair by Debra Hare-Bey | Queens: Lola, Eugenia, Ray, & LaTasha

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23Apr/16
prince

Prince Nelson Rogers: 1958 – Forever

At 1:05p I get a text from my longtime homie Shan that reads “WTF is up with these people saying my original Baby Daddy is dead!?!” I simply replied, “Nas??” half caring about internet rumors, especially when I’ve only been awake for 15 minutes. Awaiting her response I inadvertently check a facebook notification, hit the back button which led to my newsfeed, and lost all air from my body… No, God, Please… Not Prince…

I went to check the singular news source I rely on for death notices and they only confirmed “someone” died. Then, at 1:17p my King messaged me: “Hey baby. Prince died.” He was the first person to actually say it to me. A minute later my best friend called and whispered “Are you ok?” …”No…” We cried. Hung up. My King called, I was still crying, he just listened, only half understanding. I didn’t have the words to explain it to him at the time. I washed, briefly went to the gym, and cancelled the rest of my day.

I was too mentally numb to party like it’s 1999 alongside the rest of the Prince stans at the impromptu Spike Lee block party or with Quest Love at Brooklyn Bowl, so I stayed in bed. When I first realized it was official, I didn’t think being on facebook was a good idea, but I’m glad I hit the window accidentally. It was tough, but the out pour of love for Prince’s artistry has been so fulfilling. I’ve gotten to see a few clips I’ve never seen before and watched the globe bask in why I’ve loved him as far back as my memory travels… Throughout the day I received the messages I needed to use to explain why the loss of this particular icon crippled me.

 

0

@ElusiveJ explained it best!

 

2

It helped to know I wasn’t alone, like I so often felt when I spoke of Prince.

It also helped to laugh in between the blanket-soaking tears.

prince

prince

But of all, my heart was most moved by my King creating this piece for me… the tears burst through like a flood… The black and white version is in his Pan African coloring book, The Little Black Book. The colored piece is available as a print and t-shirt due to popular requests when he posted them.

prince theonewillfocus

prince theonewillfocus

My first facebook post read: “This sh*t is so unreal to me. I decided to go work more on [Taji] Mag to take my mind off of it and forgot I dedicated a page to him (it’s Vol 7, the theme is Afrofuturism, his Bday is June 7th and Vol 7 releases June 7th, etc), but now it has to be in memory of… I’m not ready.
Yesterday my old ipod finally died while I was listening to Insatiable (my fav song) and I was so momentarily pissed. If I only knew…”

I was devastated. I felt betrayed. But now… Now I’m listening to HITNRUN Phase One & Two imagining how his concerts would’ve been performing these songs so different from his 80s hits, yet still SO him.

prince

How I will remember him. Afro. Smiling. Protecting his 3rd eye. <3

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11Apr/16
Slave Stories

10 Reasons I Will Never Get Tired of ‘Slave Stories’

In the wake of WGN’s newest hit show ‘Underground’, which premiered last month starring Jurnee Smollett Bell and Aldis Hodge and follows a group of slaves attempting to escape a Georgia plantation through the Underground Railroad, I want to remind the nay sayers of the value these stories still have all these years later. Just because the ignorant choose to believe Black history started with slavery does not mean we cannot honor our foremothers and fathers by keeping their struggle alive through various art forms and reminding ourselves the stock from which we come. From soul food to head wraps the very fiber of our being, just like this country’s, was built on the backs of slaves and there is no shame in that. We should embrace our ‘slave stories’.

Here are 10 reasons I will never get tired of well crafted books, movies and television shows where the plot includes slavery.

10. I KNOW MY HISTORY

Some Black folks get wind of a movie about slavery coming out and immediately get upset. “Damn! Another slave movie!” And I get why. Slavery is not the beginning of the history of the African Diaspora nor is it the pinnacle of our existence in North America. Why can’t movies be made about our Kings and Queens? Why hasn’t a movie about Black Wall Street or The Move Organization been made? I agree with that sentiment. I do wish a wider range of our stories made it to the silver screen. HOWEVER- because I am a seeker of knowledge and information I don’t REQUIRE others to show me my people in a positive light and I don’t EXPECT them to. I do that for myself. And WE must do that for OURSELVES. For those who haven’t noticed, our images in the media will never be what we want them to be unless we are controlling them. And when we cannot control what someone else is passing off as ‘Blackness” we must provide the world with alternative interpretations of our multidimensional selves.

9. YALL STILL RACIST OUT HERE

How could I ever be upset about present day proof of the barbarism and hypocrisy of this country and where it all started? We still have men shooting down men, women and children in cold blood simply for being Brown skinned and getting away with murder because the system is rooted in the very thinking that made slavery acceptable for centuries. How could I not be a fan of knowing the truth? Plus it’s nice to be reminded how far we’ve come, but more crucially, how far we still need to go in order to achieve a truly equitable and accessible society.

8. SLAVE IS JUST A WORD

I think part of the aversion Black people have to movies about slavery is an association with slaves because they are Black. They don’t want to think of themselves in that situation and they don’t want to witness their people being subjugated. That is understandable. But what we have to understand about slaves is that they were people first. They belonged to their mothers, wives, tribes, and children long before outsiders deemed them property. It is just a word and no slave was ever “just a slave.” They were people like you and I and I am not ashamed of my ancestors. If anyone should feel shame it is the descendants of the slave holders, NOT the descendants of the slaves.

7. OUR PRESENT IS DIRECTLY EFFECTED BY OUR PAST

When you look at a slave movie, and you watch the interactions between slave master and slave, between the slaves from different African countries, between the dark skinned and bi-racial children born into slavery and treated differently because of their hair texture and complexion, you understand the root of a multitude of modern day ills effecting the Black community. There are many different types of slavery. Think of the woman with locs who had to cut them to keep her job because someone somewhere with bone straight hair decided dreads are “unprofessional” and it became unwritten law. Think of the youth killing each other in the streets because they can’t see eye to eye simply because they live in different housing developments. Think of how many times on social media you see the phrase team light skin or team dark skin. These are all modern day manifestations of century old foolishness meant to keep us separated from each other while trying to assimilate into a culture that wants nothing to do with our authentic selves.

6. THEY’RE TRYING TO ERASE SLAVERY FROM HISTORY

Did you hear about the board of education in Texas changing the name of slavery to ‘the transatlantic triangular trade’ in its text books in the first of many steps toward erasing US slave trade from the history books altogether? Cause it happened in 2012. And its happening all over America. In addition to white-washing our characters in film, excluding us all but completely in history, misrepresenting and/or continually trying to discredit our leaders in the public sphere and picking and choosing whom to celebrate based on who posed the slightest threat to the status quo, they are straight up trying to erase slavery from the collective conscious of America.

5. I WILL NEVER FORGET AND YOU SHOULDN’T EITHER

The erasure of slavery from American history would not only be an insult to the memory of the millions of slaves who were bought, sold, starved, raped, beaten and dehumanized before our time, but it would also make the current situation of Blacks in America a mystery. If you understand that Africans were deemed only 3/5 of a human being at the very same time the U.S of A was fighting for freedom and autonomy from Great Britain than you can comprehend why the Trayvons, Jordans, and Rekias of the present day cannot receive justice.

4. NO FORM OF SLAVERY WAS AS BARBARIC AS THE TRANSATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE

When discussing the brutality of the TransAtlantic slave trade people often argue that slavery was everywhere, since the beginning of time, and that some Africans sold their own people into slavery. Since this is true, some believe what happened to the Africans traveling through the middle passage and arriving in the colonies can be lumped into all the other forms of slavery throughout history. That is a cop out and an insult, not only to the memory of the human beings who lived through slavery, but also to those after them who lived through the Jim Crow era, lynch mobs, the KKK, and those after them who were beaten, jailed, attacked by dogs and sprayed with high power water hoses during the Civil Rights era not even 50 years ago. If you take a good hard look at not just slavery, but its short and long term ramifications, there is no way a comparison to anything else could be legit.

3. HISTORICAL FILMS ARE IMPORTANT

Film and literature enable us to travel to places and times we may never get to actually experience. In the case of films about slavery I think it’s important to relive that pain and anguish. Not to be overcome by it but to understand the greatness from which we come. We survived this. The strength, determination and resilience of our people is showcased by the simple fact that we are still here. After centuries of subjugation we are still fighting to be seen as human beings by some members of society, and yet we live as students, artists, doctors, lawyers, entertainers, educators, politicians, engineers, authors, athletes, and the list goes on. Knowing our history helps many of us strive for excellence in the present as a way to pay homage to those before us.

2. YOUNG PEOPLE LIKE UPDATES

If you ask someone under the age of 15 whether or not they have seen ‘Roots’ the answer will most likely be no, but if you ask them whether or not they’ve seen ’12 Years a Slave’ you might be surprised how many of them would be able to discuss it with you. It’s very important for young people to stay current and they often shy away from anything deemed ‘old (with the exception of vintage/thrift clothing which is now trendy.) Contemporary films about slavery keep dialogue on the subject open and give young people the option of simply watching a movie to learn more about the time period.

1. I HAVE MY OWN BRAIN

Black people are often made to feel as though they are wrong, rude, sensitive or delusional when they take a stance on racial issues. Some have opted out of having an opinion altogether and simply keep quiet in the wake of blatant racism or they will purposely take a self destructive stance so they don’t seem ‘butthurt.’ I think that kind of thinking has a lot to do with the sharp rise in numbers of people who are all of a sudden tired of slave movies and being very vocal about it. Part of my pride in being who I am comes from knowing where I’ve been and how people like me have persevered so I don’t mind being reminded of one particular part of our long, glorious and GLOBAL history of ingenuity, courage and uniqueness.

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