Category Archives: General

16Jul/17
Woman Gods, NayMarie Photography

Woman Gods They Don’t Want You to Know About

They do not mind telling you of Santa and the Easter Bunny and Kwanzaa…
The fables of angry and jealous gods.
They erased all of our power from the books.
This is a list of Woman Gods that I have been compiling. It is BIZARRE how many names are on this list that are never mentioned as a source of POWER, Relief or Hope in our day to day musings.
Why are women whores or helpers or the failure of man in the Bible?
Where did our stories go?
We were GODS and respected as such. Now we are Queens and Princesses and bad bitches … so on
It’s like mourning a death I never knew happened.

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Woman Gods (Africa)

woman gods

Photo by Joey “Islandboi” Rosado

Abuk – In Sudanese Dinka mythology, she is the first woman. She is the patron goddess of women and gardens, and her emblem is a small snake.

Aja – This forest goddess is honored by the Yoruba of Nigeria. She instructs her followers in the use of medicinal herbs found in the African forests.

Aje – A Nigerian Yoruba goddess of wealth.

Akonadi – An oracular goddess of Ghana.

Akwaba – This goddess symbolizes welcome and is always placed above the door. Maidens receive her image from an elder mentor as they come of age, welcoming them into their motherhood role in the tribe. In Togo, a giant Akwaba always precedes the chief in tribal procession, signifying that the Mother and reverence for Nature are the foremost communal values.

Ala -She is the earth and fertility goddess of the Ibo people of Nigeria, as well as a goddess of the underworld. She is the daughter of the great god Chuku and is considered to be the mother of all things. In the beginning she gives birth, and at the end she welcomes the dead back to her womb. In Nigeria, where she is still worshipped, she has temples situated in the center of the villages, where she has a statue surrounded by the images of other gods and animals.

Agwe – Mother of the sea in Benin. She is affectionate and nurturing to humans who honor her.

Aha Njoku – This popular goddess is worshipped by the Ibo people of Nigeria. She is responsible for yams, a central ingredient in the Ibo diet, and the women who care for them.

Aida Wedo – In Benin and Haiti she is the snake companion to Damballah-Wedo, the most popular god, who is also in snake form.

Aje – Yoruba goddess of wealth in all its forms.

Akonandi – (Ghana) An oracular goddess of justice.

Amirini – An early goddess of the Yoruba of West Africa.

Anansi -The spider goddess of Ghana, she is considered the creator’s chief official, and a hero of many tales.

Asase Ya (Asase Yaa) Ashanti earth goddess. Ghanian creator of humanity, and wife of Nyame. She was also the mother of the gods.

Ashiakle – Goddess of wealth of the Gan people of Ghana.

woman gods

Photo by NayMarie Photography

Atete – Fertility goddess of the Kafa people of Ethiopia.

Ayabba  – Hearth goddess of the Fon people of Benin.

Azeman – A name given to a female vampire or werewolf in Surinam folk belief. At night, she transforms from human to animal form and travels around drinking human blood. According to belief, the best way to stop her is by sprinkling grains or seeds about, so she will be compelled to stop and pick them up. Another way of stopping her is by propping a broom, which she won’t cross, against a door.

Aziri – The goddess of possessions.

Bayanni- (Yoruba) Sister of Shango. She was sacrificed to make her younger brother, Shango, a stronger god.

Bele Alua -(Ghana) Tree goddesss

Bomo Rambi – A moon Goddess of Zimbabwe.

Bosumabla – A sea goddess of Ghana, one of the minor deities.

Buk (Sudan-Nuer) She is the goddess of rivers and streams and the source of life. Her children are Deng, Candit and Nyaliep.

Bunzi – A rain goddess of Zaire, depicted as a rainbow-colored snake. She took over her mother’s duties as rain goddess when her mother was killed.

Buruku – She is a creator goddess of Ghana, associated with the moon and sometimes considered male.

Candit -The goddess of streams in Sudan.

Dewi Nawang Sasih – In Sudanese myth, a celestial nymph who taught people how to cook rice. The myth says she gave the women a simple recipe; place one grain of rice in a pot, boil, and wait until it sub-divides again and again until the pot is full. Her one restriction was that no man ever touch a woman’s cooking utensils. The people feasted fully, and easily, following her instructions until one king who felt above all others deliberately touched a cooking implement. The goddess in disgust departed the earth, and since that time it takes a whole bunch of rice to fill a pot, because although the grains swell up, they no longer divide and reproduce.

Dziva -The generally benevolent creatrix goddess of the Shona people of Zimbabwe. There is, however, an awful aspect to her nature.

Edinkira – An African tree goddess.

Egungun-Oya  – Another form of the Yoruba goddess of divination.

Eka Abassi – The creator of life. Her son and consort was Obumo (god of thunder and rain)

Enekpe – Goddess of the family and guardian of destiny. One story relates that when she saw that her tribe was losing a battle, she offered herself as a sacrifice to save her people, and was buried alive on the battlefield; her tribe was saved.

Eseasar – An earth goddess married to the sky god, Ebore.

Fatouma – She was born in a village near a lake in Mali that was inhabited by a virgin-devouring dragon who each year claimed a village virgin as payment for the use of the lake’s waters. The day came when Fatouma was the only eligible virgin remaining so she was left on the shore for the dragon to eat. Along came a hero named Hammadi who slew the dragon, married Fatouma, and lived happily ever after with her.

Gbadu- The daughter of Mawu. She is the goddess of fate of the Fon or Dahomey people of Benin, and she is saddened by the fighting among her mother’s mortal children.

Gleti- The moon goddess of Benin. She is the mother of all the stars (Gletivi). An eclipse is said to be caused by the shadow of the her husband when he comes to “visit”.

Gonzuole -The first woman of Liberia. Without a mate she gave birth to many beautiful daughters; they lived together in a village without men for many years. Eventually some men nearby trapped them all and Gonzuole, fearing for her daughters’ safety, agreed to give them in marriage to the men.

Hyrax -The wife of the creator god I Kaggen (praying mantis) revered by men of the western bush.

Ilankaka – The sun goddess of the Nkundo of Zaire was trapped by a man who was hunting during the night. She begged to be released and promised him much wealth for doing so, but the only wealth he wanted was her, so she agreed to marry him. Soon pregnant, she refused to eat anything but forest rats. Because it was known that a man had to provide for any whim of a pregnant woman, the man was kept very busy trapping for her. One night, however, she awakened to realize she was no longer pregnant. Shocked, she discovered the baby had slipped out of the womb and was already eating meat. He grew up to be the hero Itonde, who captured the heart of the Elephant Girl Mbombe.

Inkosazana – A female spirit of the Zulus who makes the maize grow. The deity of agriculture, she is venerated in springtime.

Lissa – The Dahomey mother goddess. Mother of the Sun god Maou and the Moon god Gou. Her totem was the chameleon.

Mami Wata – A water-spirit, sometimes described as a mermaid figure, who can found throughout the western coastal regions and into central Africa. Mami Wata is described as having long dark hair, very fair skin and compelling eyes. Although she may appear in dreams and visions to her devotees as a beautiful mermaid, she is also said to walk the streets of modern African cities in the guise of a gorgeous but elusive woman. She is interested in all things contemporary: some of her favorite offerings include sweet, imported perfumes, sunglasses and Coca-Cola. Nonetheless, the spirit appears to be related to other water spirits (known in Igbo, a language of southeastern Nigeria, as ‘ndi mmili) who have a much longer history on the continent. Mami Wata’s colors are red and white. Those she afflicts with visions and temptations, and who experience her as an obsession or an illness, may wear the red of sickness and dangerous heat. Others who have a more positive orientation towards the spirit may show their blessings by wearing white. Most devotees wear a combination of red and white clothing. Mami Wata is also said to have a number of avatars on earth- mortal women who have the same look as the deity and who act as her “daughters.” Mami Wata may give wealth to her devotees, her “daughters” or to her (male) spouses, but she is never known to give fertility. Some Igbo stories suggest that the fish under the waters are her children, and that she uses them as firewood. Mami Wata is sometimes seen as a metaphor for modern African conditions — having the knowledge of global wealth and the desire for large-scale consumption, but lacking the actual wealth or access to the world’s wealth that would enable Africans to participate in that system.

Mamlambo – The Zulu goddess of rivers.

Marwe – A Chaga folktale heroine.

Massassi – The maiden created for Mwuetsi, in the mythology of the Makoni tribe of Zimbabwe. She bore to her husband grasses, bushes and trees.

Mawu – Mawu is the Creator/Moon Goddess known among the people from the Dahomey region of West Africa, the female aspect of the divinity Mawu-Lisa. She is associated with the moon, night, fertility, motherhood, gentleness, forgiveness, rest and joy. The cosmology of the Fon has the Earth as floating on the water, while above circle the heavenly bodies on the inner surface of a gourd. The son of Mawu-Lisa, Da (Danh) the cosmic serpent, helps in ordering the universe; he had 3500 coils above the earth, and the same number below. Together these coils support Mawu-Lisa’s creation. After creating the earth and all life and everything else on it, she became concerned that it might be too heavy, so she asked the primeval serpent, Aido Hwedo, to curl up beneath the earth and hold it up in the sky. When she asked Awe, a monkey she had also created, to help out and make some more animals out of clay, he boasted to the other animals and challenged Mawu. Gbadu, the first woman Mawu had created, saw all the chaos on earth and told her children to go out among the people and remind them that only Mawu can give Sekpoli – the breath of life. Gbadu instructed her daughter, Minona, to go out among the people and teach them about the use of palm kernels as omens from Mawu. When Awe, the arrogant monkey climbed up to the heavens to try to show Mawu that he too could give life, he failed miserably. Mawu made him a bowl of porridge with the seed of death in it and reminded him that only she could give life and that she could also take it away.

Mbaba Mwana Waresa – A beloved goddess of the Zulu people of Southern Africa, primarily because she gave them the gift of beer. She is the goddess of the rainbow, rain, harvest, and agriculture. The story of her search for a husband is well known, and recently appeared in a beautifully illustrated children’s book.

Mboze – Mother of the Woyo people of Zaire, and mother of Bunzi. When her husband found out he was not the father of Bunzi, he killed Mboze.

Mebeli – In Congo, she is the mother of the race of man (given life by Massim Biambe) with god Phebele.

Moombi  – She is the creator goddess of the Kikuyu who mothered nine daughters by Gikuyu.

Mujaji – The rain queen of the Lovedu people of the Transvaal.

Musso Koroni – The goddess of disorder among the Bambara of Africa and the first woman to be created. She is the daughter of the Voice of the Void, and wife of Pemba. She planted Pemba in the soil, but disliked his thorns and so forswore the god. Now she wanders the earth, causing sadness and disorder among mankind.

Nambi – (Buganda) The first woman.

Nana-Bouclou  – (Benin) Primal god of the Ewe people of the Dahomey, both male and female, who created the twins from whom all the Voodoo gods descended.

Nana Buluku – (Nana, Nan Nan, Nana Baruku, Na Na Baraclou, Boucalou) As Nana Buluku she is the primordial creator goddess of the Fon Nation of Benin (Dahomey). As Nana Buruku she is first Grandmother to all the Divinities and first human woman in the religion of the Yorubas. It was of Nana that the Cosmic Twins Mawu and Lisa were born. From Mawu and Lisa came the Cosmic Egg, and the Cosmic Seed that germinated the Egg. This egg was formed about the center of Ashe, the realm of Ikode Orun. From this egg hatched the Great Irunmole. So Nana Baruku is the Womb of Olodumare, Mawu is the Cosmic Egg, and Lisa is Olodumare’s Seed. Once set into motion, they are the creation of all that is, was and ever will be.  When the Orisha called Obatala formed the first human head upon the face of the earth, it was Olodumare who came down from the great Adobe of the Spiritual Realm, and breathed life into it. It was through the mysteries of the breath of Olodumare that Nana Baruku first came forth and took up residence within a clay figure, becoming the first living soul. Thus Nana Baruku was both Great Divinity, first of all ancestors, the great Grandmother of the Divinities, but also the Ancient Grandmother and progenitor of the human race. In human form Nana Buruku was known by the name Ayizan. Ayizan, (Nanan) is envisioned as an ancient black grandmother, her face covered with palm fronds in honor of the palm trees which she used to create shelter upon earth. In her arms Ayizan carries a woven basket containing bark, roots, and herbs. Ayizan was the first human herbalist, sacred to her is the mandrake root, which resembles a human form and is a symbol of her human husband Osanyin. With her vast knowledge of herbs she attracted the attention of the Orisha Osanyin, whom took form and became known as Loco. In life Ayizan lived in a marshy swamp, she was a powerful ancestor who was unsurpassed in the knowledge of herbs and root magic. Sacred to her is quicksand, which surrounded her home and protected her from wild animals.

Oboto – The goddesses of serenity.

Oduduwa – A creator deity and earth goddess of the Yoruba.

Oshun  – (Osun) The Orisa of Love and Sensuality. The Yoruba peoples of Nigeria brought Oshun to the New World via Brazil and Cuba. She is depicted as an old wise woman sad at the loss of her beauty. Alternately she may be shown as tall, light brown-skinned and with the sensuality of a prostitute. She is patroness of rivers and the bloodstream, and wears seven brass bracelets. She wears a mirror at her belt to admire herself, is companioned by the primping peacock and cricket, and carries river water in her pot. Powerful spells are worked through this lady of opposites. Love and sensuality are the domains of Oshun. Tall and brown-skinned, she is patroness of rivers and the bloodstream, always carrying her mirror. Powerful love spells are worked through this Lady. Oshun, the Yoruba Goddess of Love and Life-Sustaining Rivers, is the Goddess of all the arts, but especially dance. Beauty belongs to Oshun and represents the human ability to create beauty for its own sake, to create beyond need. It is also said that she is the knitter of civilization, since great cities have been founded, for the most part, along rivers in order to supply water to their populations.

Oya -The Yoruba warrior goddess of the wind, the primeval mother of chaos, the mother of nine children (the nine tributaries of the Niger River). She creates change of fortune, and her power is associated with lightning, tornadoes, earthquakes and other storms, cemeteries and death. Her motherly strength inspires us to embrace change and learn from it. Using her machete, or sword of truth, she cuts through stagnation and clears the way for new growth. She does what needs to be done. She is the wild woman, the force of change; also the queen of the marketplace and a shrewd businesswoman who is adept with horses. As the wind, she is the first breath and the last, the one who carries the spirits of the dead to the other world, which is why she is associated with cemeteries. Oya is tall, stately, and fierce in battle. She is the orisa of creative power and action. They say every breath we take is the gift of Oya. The other two Ancient Mothers are Osun and Yemaja.

Pamba – The creator and sustainer of life in Ovambo mythology. The Ovambo, a matrilineal people, declare that ‘the mother of pots is a hole in the ground; the mother of people is god.’

Yemayah –  (Yemaja, Yemoja) She is one of the great goddesses of the Nigerian Yoruba. The Orisha of the Ocean and Motherhood, Yemayah was brought to the New World by the Yoruba people of Nigeria via Brazil and Cuba, where she has been venerated for centuries as Protectress during the middle passage of slavery. She was the sister and wife of Aganju, the soil god, and mother by him of Orungan, god of the noonday sun. She was said to be the daughter of the sea into whose waters she empties.  She is also an avatar of Mama Wata, the mother of waters. Even as she slept, she would create new springs, which gushed forth each time she turned over. The first time she walked on earth, fountains that later became rivers sprang up wherever she set foot. Sea shells, through which the priestesses and priests could hear the voice of the universe, were among her first gifts to the people. She is known by different names in many localities; As Yemoja (Yemayah) she is the power (orisa) of the ocean and motherhood. She is long-breasted, the goddess of fishes, and wears an insignia of alternating crystal and blue beads. She has a strong, nurturing, life-giving yet furiously destructive nature. She is considered the Great Witch, the ultimate manifestation of female power.  As Yemanja (Imanje) in Brazil she is ocean goddess of the crescent moon, as Ymoa in West Africa she is the river goddess who grants fertility to women. In Cuba she is known as Yemaya (Yemaya Ataramagwa, wealthy queen of the sea; Yemaya Achabba, the stern goddess; Yemaya Oqqutte, the violent goddess; or Yemaya Olokun, the dream goddess). She is known as Agwe in Haiti. She is also referred to as Yamoja, which is a contraction of the the sentence “Iyamo eja”, meaning “our mother” or “my mother of fishes”. Among the Brazilian Umbandists, Yemaja is the goddess of the sea and patroness of shipwrecked persons. In Santeria, Yemaja (Yemaya) is the equivalent of the Catholic saint Our Lady of Regla. The river Ogun is associated with her, because the water of this river is considered to be a remedy for infertility.

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Woman Gods (Various Regions)

Aphrodite (Greek) – The beautiful Goddess of love and fertility. No man could resist Aphrodite when she wore her magic girdle.  Her name means foam born or raised from foam as she was birthed from the churning sea.

Arianrhod (Celtic) – Goddess of fertility, rebirth and the weaving of cosmic time and fate.  The last aspect of her nature is contained within her name which means “silver wheel” or “round wheel,” suggesting her importance in the cycles of life.  Other common spellings of her name are Aranhod and Arianrod.

Artemis (Greek) – An independent spirit, she is Goddess is of the hunt, nature and birth. There are several different theories about the origin of her name, one school of thought says it comes from an ancient word for “safe” and another argues that it means “strong limbed.”   Either way the suggestion is that this maiden Goddess has the strength and ability to protect herself from any unwanted attention.

Athena (Greek) – Goddess of war and wisdom and domestic crafts. Plato believed her name meant “mind of God” whilst others suggest it comes an ancient word meaning “sharp.”  Both these words point to Athena’s great intellectual ability to see the true nature of a situation and to develop successful strategies.

Bast (Egyptian) – The famous cat Goddess, she protected pregnant woman and children. Bast was a very sensual Goddess who enjoyed music, dance and perfume.  Her name comes from the bas jars used to store perfumes and ointments.  Other versions of this Goddess names include: Bastet, Baset, Ubasti and Pasht.

Ceres (Roman) – This Goddess of agriculture and grains name comes from the Indo European word root, ker meaning “to grow.”  In turn her name has become the origin of our modern word cereal.

Cerridwen (Celtic) – Goddess of moon, magic, agriculture, nature, poetry language, music, art, science and astrology. She was also keeper of the cauldron.  Her name means “chiding love.” Ceridwen, Caridwen, Kerritwen, Keridwen, Kyrridwen are other variations of her name.

Demeter (Greek) – Goddess of the harvest who possessed great knowledge of the best way to grow, preserve and harvest grain.  She was also the devoted mother of Persephone.  Her name reflects her nurturing personality as it means “earth mother” in Greek.

Diana (Roman) – Goddess of the hunt and wild animals.  She later took over from Luna as the Roman Goddess of the moon, responsible for fertility and childbirth. Her name means  “heavenly divine,” reflecting her celestial role.

Eirene (Greek) – This Greek Goddess name means peace in her native language, expressing her diplomatic nature.  Her name also often appears as Irene.

Eos (Greek) – A sunny natured Goddess whose name means dawn.

Epona (Celtic) – Protector of horses, donkeys, and mules.  She was also an ancient fertility Goddess.  Epona’s Goddess name comes from the Gaulish word epos meaning “great mare.”

Ereshkigal (Sumerian) – Goddess of Attalu, the land of the dead and ancestral memories. Her name translates as “great lady under the earth.”  Irkalla is an alternative name by which this Goddess is identified.

Freya (Nordic) – Goddess of love, beauty, fertility, war, wealth, divination and magic. Her name comes from the ancient Norse word for lady or mistress.  There are several variations of the spellings of this Goddess name including: Freyja, Freyr and Freyja.

Frigg (Nordic) – Goddess of marriage, childbirth, motherhood, wisdom, household management and weaving and spinning. Her name means “beloved” in ancient Norse and is derived from fri “to love.”  She is also known as Frige, Friia, Frija and Frea.

Gaia (Greek) – Goddess of the Earth and prophecy. She is the primordial mother and a personification of Mother Earth. She gave birth to the Titans. Her name is also spelt Gaeo.

Hathor (Egyptian) – This heavenly cow’s areas of influence included music, dancing, joy and fertility. Her name translates as “house of Horus”.  Alternative names for this Goddess are Het-Hert, Hetheru, Mehturt, Mehurt, Mehet-Weret, and Mehet-uret,

Hebe (Greek) – Hebe’s name literally means youth or in the prime of life. She was one of the daughters of Zeus and Hera.  Her role was to serve the nectar and ambrosia to the Gods and Goddesses that prevented them from aging.

Hekate (Greek) – Goddess of the wild places, childbirth and the crossroads. She is closely associated with magic and witchcraft.  Her name is said to be derived from the Greek word hekas meaning “far off” describing her unworldly, shamanic nature.  Also known as Hecate.

Hella (Nordic) – The fearsome Goddess of the Nordic realm of the dead.  Her name is derived from the word kel, meaning “to conceal.”  There are numerous spellings of her name including Halje Hell, Hel, Helle, Hela and Holle.

Hera (Greek) – Queen of the Olympians and Goddess of marriage and birth.  The meaning of her Goddess name has been lost.  One historian claims her name could be connected to the Greek word for seasons “hora,” suggesting she is ripe for marriage.

Hestia (Greek) – The domestic Goddess of the Greek Pantheon, she rules over the hearth and home.  Her name comes from the Greek word estia meaning “she that dwells or tarries.”  This reflects the importance of the role that the ancient Greeks attributed to this Goddess in sacrificing her position as an Olympian to guard the fire and maintain a happy home.

Inanna (Sumerian) – Goddess of love, war, and fertility. Inanna was the personification of the morning and evening star.  Her beautiful name means “lady of the sky.” This Goddess is closely linked to Ishtar and Nin-anna.

Indunn (Nordic) – Goddess of youth and springtime.  Her name means she who renews and has several alternative spellings including Indun, Iduna and Idhunna.

Iris (Greek) – Goddess of the rainbow and messenger to the Gods. Her name means rainbow in her native language.

woman gods

Photo by NayMarie Photography

Isis (Egyptian) – This famous Goddess has so many different aspects, her most important roles are as Goddess of life and magic. Isis’s name comes from the Egyptian word aset and means “she of throne” in other words the Queen of the Goddesses.

Juno (Roman) – Goddess of marriage, pregnancy and childbirth.  She protected the finances of the citizens of Rome. Her name is mystery, it speaks of a contradictory role for this Goddess, before her alignment to the matronly, Greek Goddess, Hera. This is because her name is derived from the root yeu meaning “vital force” indicating a more youthful, maiden Goddess.

Lakshmi (Hindu)- Goddess of abundance of material and spiritual wealth.  Her name is derived from the Sanskrit word “laksya” meaning aim or goal

Maat (Egyptian) – Goddess of truth, justice and balance.  She prevented the creation from reverting to chaos and judged the deeds of the dead with her feather.  This Goddess name stems from the word Mayet meaning “straight.” This reflects her unbending nature in upholding what is right and just.

Minerva (Roman) – Goddess of wisdom, medicine and crafts.  Her name is linked to the Latin word mens which means “intellect,” suggesting the intelligence and inventiveness of this ancient Goddess.

Morrigan (Celtic) – The terrifying crow Goddess associated with war and death on the battlefield.  She was queen of phantoms, demons, shape-shifters and patroness of priestesses and Witches.  Her name means “great queen” in the old Irish language. Morrigan was also known as Morgane, Morrígu, Morríghan, Mor-Ríoghain and Morrígna.

Nephthys (Egyptian) – Goddess of death, decay and the unseen.  Her name speaks of her priestess role as it means “lady of the temple enclosure.” Other variations of her title include Nebet-het and Nebt-het.

Nike (Greek) – This Greek Goddess name means victory, she represented success especially in the sporting arena which is why her name was chosen for a famous brand of sportswear.

Ostara (Germanic) – The spring Goddess whose name is linked to the East and the dawn. The early Christians took her fertility symbols of eggs and hares and incorporated them into the Easter celebrations.

Parvarti (Hindu) – Goddess of love and devotion, her name means “she of the mountain.”

Persephone (Greek) – Daughter of Demeter and Queen of the Underworld.  She was also none as Kore reflecting the Maiden aspect of this Goddess.  Other variations of her name include Persephoneia, Persephassa, Persephatta and Pherepapha

Pomona (Roman) –Protected fruiting trees and gardens.  Her name is derived from the Latin word pomus, meaning “fruit tree.”

Rhea (Greek) – The ancient Titan Earth Goddess, responsible for the fertility of the soil and women.  The name is most likely a form of the word era meaning “earth”, although it has also been linked to ‘rheos’ the Greek term for “stream.”

Selene (Greek) – Selene was the Titan personification of the moon, unsurprising then that her name means moon in Greek.

Seshat (Egyptian) – The great scribe and librarian Goddess who was responsible for accounting, architecture, astronomy, historical records and mathematics.  Her Goddess name means “she who scibes.”  It is also appears as Safkhet, Sashet, Seshata, Sesat, Sesheta and Sheshat.

Themis (Greek) – Goddess of divine justice, order and customs.  She also had the gift of prophecy. Her name simply means “law of nature” or “divine nature.”

Venus (Roman) – Goddess and love and beauty.  Her Goddess name has become synonymous with her role as the woman who all men desire.

Vesta (Roman) – Guardian of the sacred Flame.  Vesta’s name and function is derived from the Greek Goddess Hesti

Chela Noldon | Twitter & Instagram  : @hollysaucy

Featured photo courtesy of NayMarie Photography

 

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blerd city con

Calling all Black Nerds! BLERD City Con is Celebrating You in New York City

blerd city conBLERD City Con is about to bring a revolutionary event to the historic Dumbo Spot in New York, NY — and you’re going to want to grab your tickets soon. BLERD City is an innovative, unique, creative, and challenging celebration of the Black community and all the glorious nerdiness held within. Art, science, film, literature and technology; it’s all going to be on display from Sunday, July 29th through Saturday, July 30th. This family-friendly festival is going to be hyperactive and fueled with fantasy and fandom.
“What is a BLERD?”  A Blerd is simply a “Black Nerd”. They are those who have an interest in what others would say are strange and specific things.  An interest in talking about unrivaled passions for characters, stories, and forms of art that often outweigh real celebrities.  The goal of Blerd City Con is to honor creativity of the Blerd culture, encouraging inclusion, community, and awareness in the process.
Clairesa Clay, the founder of BLERD City Con, has a simple and inspired mission: “I want the audience to experience Horror, Science Fiction, and Fantasy by the talents of leading African Diasporic filmmakers, writers, coders and creators who are serving the community of Black and Nerdy.
BLERD City is a conference dedicated to showcasing the multi-dimensional complexity of black nerdiness through all spectrums of creativity, invention, and innovation. We’re going to have panels, workshops, film screenings, special guests, presentations, and so much more. Visit our marketplace for gaming and comic books and take your kids to our all ages science and technology exploration center.
This year, BLERD City Con will be honoring L.A. Banks for her outstanding contributions in fantasy horror speculative writing and non-fiction with an award in her name. BLERD City Con has worked with some of the most renowned, accomplished, and critically-acclaimed presenters within the community:
Sheree Renée Thomas, award-winning fiction writer, editor, and poet, and author of Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction from the African Diaspora and Dark Matter: Reading the Bones. Sheree will be honored with the new L.A. Banks award.
 Tim Fielder, graphic artist, cartoonist, and animator, best known for Afrofuturism: The Next Generation.
Warrington Hudlin, veteran producer of film, television, and online media
Floyd Webb, an award-winning filmmaker and groundbreaking film festival producer.
Regine Sawyer, owner and writer at Locket Down Production a press comic book company. Also the founder of the Women in Comics Collective International.
BLERD City Con’s mission is to provide the Black community with a tangible connection to the talented and cutting-edge professionals working within the arts and sciences, providing room for inspiration, networking, and education.
In addition to featured guests, BLERD City Con panels and workshops include:
People of Color Gaming
Venture Capital for Technology
Women in Comics
The Great Black Panther Debate
Afropast, Afrofuture
Black Karate
Coders and Writers
SciFi/Fantasy/Writers Reading
AfroCrowd: A Wikipedia Workshop
This expansive cultural celebration will be held over five areas: The Dumbo Spot (Panels), Creative Chaos (Book Readings), Automatic Studios (Film Screenings and Panels), The Green Desk (Workshops), and Brooklyn Bridge Park (Children’s Corner). You don’t want to miss this one-of-a-kind event and experience. Tickets are available now.
 
About BLERD CITY
BLERD City Con is a two-day conference celebrating the fantastic NERDiness in you! Join panels & workshops in Games, Tech, SciFi/Horror/Fantasy film screenings and book readings.
Get your tickets to BLERD City Con here!
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07Jun/17

Taji Vol11: Ethereal

Release Jun 7 2017 | Vol11 of Taji is packed full of Black Beauty & Culture fulfilling it’s theme of “Ethereal”! This volume features rising cover model Aïssata. Gracing the pages are the Editor’s Pick: Khinky.com is the Only Black Woman Owned Loc Extension Manufacturer; the community feature on the fitness trio “The Mix-Tape”; Hair Feature by Sophisticated Locs Salon; “Beginners Advice for Building your Savings from Phil Small” by Nay Marie; “Spiritual Technology of Freedom” by Jashua Sa’Ra; E.M.E.R.G.E. founded by Master Pioneer Hair Stylist Diane C. Bailey; the elegant jewels and body butters of TheCelestineCollection; “13 Reasons Why We Should Discuss Misogynoir by Tajh Danielle Sutton; “#BlackLoveConvo: Affection Between Black Men” with Dapper Dr. Feel; our Health & Fitness Advice Column with Trainer Clint & Vegan Fun with Delliz the Chef – “Personal Pan Pizza”; Featured artist Will Focus; Must Have Comic Book: Ajala by N. Steven Harris; the Taji Model Winners; and more!!

RSVP for the Vol 11 June 4th Release Event at TajiMagVol11.eventbrite.com!

Purchase your copy now at ‘Purchase Taji’!

Vol11

Purchase Taji Mag | Vol 11

Taji Mag is a Black Beauty & Culture specialty publication highlighting the artistry of our essence.

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Glamourina

Glamourina Announces New Collection of Athleisure Wear

Local Washington, DC designers Kia Renee and Nekol Choo are thrilled to announce the premier of their Glamourina Kente Athleisure line. Glamourina is an online athleisure apparel store. Co-founders Kia and Nekol are working mothers who have always had a passion for fashion and desire to encourage women and uplift women. “Our mission is to provide affordable, comfortable, and quality athleisure apparel to average, and above average working women and girls in efforts to promote self-esteem through beauty, health and fitness.”

Glamourina

Why Kente? Kente is a traditional tribal fabric originating from Africa.  Africa is a strong and powerful continent.  They are here to motivate and encourage women to be strong, powerful and confident. “We are especially excited about our Kente line of athleisure apparel,” said Kia and Nekol. “Our followers are in for a treat this year.  When we premier the new line in April, everyone will finally get a glimpse of a very special design we’ve been working on for the past two years.”

Glamourina’s Kente Athleisure line will be available for purchase online exclusively at www.Glamourina.com before expanding to other retailers. Follow them on all social networks @shopglamourina!

Glamorina

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yoni steaming

(Re)Discover Yoni Steaming to Heal Your Womb

yoni steamingMeet Yendys Nefer-Atum, Khametic Priestess of sacred feminine wellness, natural hair care professional, maker of Ancient Blends organic hair and body care product line, holistic health educator and founder/owner of The Cowrie Shell Center for Holistic Hair Care and Scalp Wellness Therapies Located in Brooklyn for the past three decades.
Yendys is also known as a Yoni Alchemist, so it makes perfect sense that she is the creator of Earth Yoni Blessing Oil (Vaginal Massage Oil) and Yoni Steaming herbal remedy. Her company is also known for Yoni Steaming.
The Yoni is the vagina, womb, and refers to the whole reproductive area. Yoni is an ancient Sanskrit word for the vagina as a divine opening and a sacred temple. Yendys has cultivated a sacred, intimate connection with many women’s yonis. Her company provides Yoni Steams as well as traditional steaming herbs.
Yoni steams are known by numerous women of many cultures to:
· Significantly reduce pain, bloating and exhaustion associated with menstruation cycle.
· Decrease excessive menstrual flow.
· Regulate irregular or absent menstrual cycles.
· Improve fertility.
· Speed healing and tone the reproductive system after child birth.
· Treat uterine fibroids, ovarian cysts, uterine weakness, uterine prolapse & endometriosis.
· Assist with the repair of a vaginal tear, episiotomy, or C-section scar.
· Assist with the healing of hemorrhoids.
· Treat chronic vaginal/yeast infections, and works to maintain healthy odor.
· Relieve symptoms of menopause including dryness or pain during intercourse.
· Detoxify the root chakra and womb
· Release stored negative emotions or traumas that hold us back.
· Tap into the root energy that gives rise to our visions and creative potential.
BOOK YOUR YONI STEAMING APPOINTMENT TODAY AT THE COWRIE SHELL CENTER!
EMAIL: info@cowrieshell.com
YONI-STEAM QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS!
Yoni Steaming
Yoni Steaming
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27May/17

Lindi Roaming the Streets on Africa Day

Lindi Roaming the Streets on Africa Day

“RANTA E WELE”

by Thabiso Thabethe

The mural painted at a public park in Winterveld PTA, South Africa, titled‘ RANTA E WELE’ (meaning the rand has dropped)’ is his first politically inclined artwork and first non commissioned public artwork. The piece is not a lash at the current ruling party, the president for the political instability. “I was simply attempting to reflect the concerns of the people in our poverty stricken township. After the SA president reshuffled the cabinet we have witnessed a decline in the value of the South African rand and this follows criticism from all political parties, accompanied by a few marches and demonstrations from the general public.”

   

“The monochrome painting with a blood red for the injured and dying impala on the Rand, signifying the current state of affairs locally and nationally was a subtle yet effective way for me to be a mouthpiece for the people. I have used a spear to symbolize that the hurt to the Rand/ the country is done by one of the natives. The whole coin is still steel/silver material but the blood is ‘realistic’, because the value of the Rand is an idea which is generally accepted as a substance possessing value to pay for goods and services within the country… but its declining value has a very realistic backlash that the poor are not able to ignore. Taxi prices in Pretoria South Africa have gone up and that affects food prices and local businesses, so Winterveld people are facing difficulties to get by, hence the impala/springbok on the Rand (the prey representing ‘the people’) is turning its face backwards to express anguish and hopefully escape from the predator’s fatal spear throw.”

KausKulture is a Designer Brand that is primarily focused, but not limited to custom sock designs. KausKulture is inspired by the collective aspirations of the youth of South Africa through the expression of art in textile. It was formally established by two young black entrepreneurs Kabelo Moabelo and Marcus Prime Chabane, who wish to add value to the livelihood of our communities.

KausKulture aims to influence the fashion industry with its originality, spontaneity and class. The design element go against uniformity but still maintaining sophistication. “We have an unparalleled appreciation for attention to detail and cater for diverse and broad market.”  The company was established in 2015, when the spark to establish KausKulture as a movement started as a conversation and continues to grow as an instrument of change and artistic inspiration impact to our generation.

Kgomotso Neto Tleane

 A South African photographer with the mouldings of rural life and trimmings of fast paced city living. Born and raised in Ga-Maja, the Johannesburg based photographer creates imagery that effortlessly reflects both the grime and glory of the city he inhabits.
 
Known for his documentation of informal and underrated aesthetics, taxis and everyday people form a prominent feature in his work, whilst his collaboration with renowned graphic designer, Rendani Nemakhavhani in The Honey is testament to his strengths as a conceptual photographer.
 
Featured on various tv and radio stations, various local and international publications such as between 10and5, okayafrica, Asian Photography (India) and Radio Africa Magazine (Barcelona) among others for his work, Tleane along with Nemakhavhani were one of the participating artists in this year’s Fresh Produce category at the lauded Turbine Art Fair
 
African Art is a term typically used for the art of Sub-Saharan Africa. Often, casual, amateur observers tend to generalize “traditional” African art, but the continent is full of people, societies and civilizations, each with a unique visual culture. The definition may also include the art of the African Diasporas, such as the art of African Americans. Despite this diversity, there are some unifying artistic themes when considering the totality of the visual culture from the continent of Africa.
 
  
Africa is the world’s second-largest and second-most-populous continent. At about 30.3 million km2 (11.7 million square miles) including adjacent islands, it covers 6% of Earth’s total surface area and 20.4% of its total land area. With 1.2 billion people as of 2016, it accounts for about 16% of the world’s human population. One interesting fact about Africa that is truly amazing is that long before humans were around (the early Mesozioc Era), Africa was joined to other continents in a massive continent called Pangaea. Over millions of years this huge continent broke apart shaping the world landscape as we know it today in what has been referred to the continental drift. On this day 2017 May 25, we salute You Mama Africa.

#AFRICA RISE
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27May/17
Devon Anthony

Devon Anthony is Bringing the Music You Want to Hear

Devon AnthonyJames Brathwaite aka Devon Anthony is about to release his music to  his already sizeable army of fans. With his mixtape expected to be a success and fame imminent, the exciting, newfangled sound that he has made his own is certain to gain interest from across New York.

His first foray into learning story writing  came when he was 13 years old. Later he began to write poetry, which he continued with for three years before finally entering in the NAACP ActSo Program, a decision which he never looked back from.

As his confidence grew and his style developed, he soon saw a loyal following begin to grow and he became a popular local hit in the Brooklyn music and poetry scene. His talent with a variety of musical instruments only added to his appeal, and his unique baritone sound with a twist started to find an appreciative audience.

He is keen to point out that everything he listens to directs his musical development in some way. However, he would certainly include Sam Cook, Bob Marley, The Police, Ray Charles, John Coltrane and Stevie Wonder as amongst his biggest influences.

Finally, after honing his unique sound over recent years, he is now preparing to release his mixtape, ‘Devon Portrait’, which underlies the changes that James has gone through over recent years. The biggest of these was the ‘switch’ from poetry to rap , which has allowed him to develop as a person, and has in turn profoundly aided his musical development.

Devon AnthonyOther changes that have affected and influenced his song-writing over recent years have been his development of political writing, an area that he pays a lot of attention to and incorporates to a certain degree in his music, employing sound bites of news reports to add an extra dimension to some of his songs.

And as if that wasn’t enough, James has taken it upon himself to take up an entirely different, though wholly satisfying, hobby of weight training. The satisfaction he gets from indulging in his many passions has led to create a better person, although he is not at his full potential due to the amount of time that he spends performing.

Check him out below!

https://devonent.simdif.com
https://www.instagram.com/devon_entertainment
https://m.facebook.com/DevonAnthonyEnt

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26May/17
Camp Lyfe

Introducing South Carolina Hip Hop Trio Camp Lyfe

Introducing Ludazh, Savage aka Bandit, and Kada From Darlington. They are known among their fans and supporters as: Camp Lyfe. They currently reside in Columbia, South Carolina.
Camp Lyfe
Their current album is titled “Meet Da Camp.” They are working on a new project right now, but they haven’t given it a name just yet. Ludaz was inspired to do it by the fact that he feels the music industry needs some good music right now. Life inspired them to write it and show people the world through their eyes.
Ludaz doesn’t consider himself an MC or lyricist. He just considers himself a real man giving you his street stories. Either he has seen it or he has done it. But, on the other hand Kada considers himself a lyricist and Bandit certainly knows that he is an entertainer!

They write and create their own music. They have collaborated with as many Artists that they could who were serious about their craft including Lil Ru, Nine Million, and Mo Beatz on their “Meet Da Camp” project.

Kada always loved music. He remembers his grandmother having literally hundreds of records in her living room wall unit. His father played almost every instrument. He started writing in middle school as a competition to see who could write the best verse with his friends at the time. Yet, for Ludazh writing songs is like therapy to him. In general life inspires him. As long as he’s living he always has something to rap about. Bandits’ mother is a passionate music lover, which she passed down to him. So she inspired him to create music.

In Kadas’ world his most memorable performance was their first show in their hometown, as the headliner for a comedy show. They were so young and excited. He loved every minute of it because they got to share something with the world. They worked hard and practiced for hours to prepare for. Ludazh he doesn’t really have a memorable stage performance moment because they all are LIT! But if he had to pick one it would be when they opened a show for Master P. Bandit says that his most memorable moment was when he did a song with “Soul 4 Real.”

Ludazh shares that if he could perform with any popular artist in the industry today, he’d choose Stevie Wonder! He thinks the fella is incredible and that it would be a good move for the CamP, mixing in two genres and all. Kada let’s us know that if he could perform with a popular artist today it would have to be Jay-Z. He’s a music mogul and has branched out into things other than music.

Ludazh tells us that what makes them stand out from other Artists is that they’re not afraid to be themselves. They don’t always have to be the coolest. They don’t mind laughing, and having a good time. Life is about living and enjoying it so they show that through their music, their personalities and all.

The future for Camplyfe is Lit with a lot of opportunities. They have a lot of surprises up their sleeves. The Jody video is on the way. Their CD is coming out this summer. In general the future holds more of everything for camp lyfe from music to fashion. They are also expecting to gain international recognition for their music company.

Their Conact Info and Work Can Be Found at the Following: 
Camp Lyfe
— Kada @mrfreshoncampus on all social media

— Bandit @scbanditcrc on IG
— Ludazh @Camplyfe on FB, IG, & Twitter

Check them out on their website www.camplyfe.com

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15May/17
Black man Chance

Because You Need Black Men on Your Timeline

If our #MustLoveBeards series taught the internet anything, it’s that we love Black men. Blue collar Black men, creative Black men, Black men climbing the corporate ladder, Black men taking care of their families, activist Black men, and poetic Black men all have a place in our hearts.

This week, for #MCM we decided to bless your timeline with 3 Black men doing great things.

RASHID CAMPBELL – OAKLBlack menAND, CA

This 25 year old Oakland activist and father leads a youth program dedicated to supporting youth of color in the Bay area. He teaches students about how to incorporate history from the African Diaspora into their everyday lives. Rashid completed his studies at Oklahoma State University on a debate scholarship and he won top speaker at the National College Debate Tournament. His peers admire the way he talks about the importance of Black love in our community. His students are grateful to have a coach who is so dedicated to helping them be successful. Long hours and frequent trips across the country take up a lot of his time, but it seems to be worth it when you look at his track record and the passion he has for young Black students and their success.

CHANCE THE RAPPER – CHICAGO, IL

Who doesn’t know Chance the Rapper at this point? This Black man is gifted, philanthropically inBlack man Chanceclined, and charming. The Chicago native often speaks of his commitment to family and Christianity in a way most rappers don’t.  His powerful verse on Kanye West’s ‘Ultralight Beam’ shows just how talented he really is. Chance the Rapper has an uncanny ability to walk the line being humble and confident. We love the way he navigates his fame.

Chance is also beautifully flawed. On multiple occasions, he discusses mental health, addiction, and self love. While most people, no matter their level of fame, tend to shy away from personal flaws or mistakes they’ve made, he puts his history on display for the world to see. He made hip hop history at the last Grammy Awards show and will surely continue to impress. Beyond his professional accolades, he continues to offer his music to fans for free and has devoted over $1 million of his own money to youth development programs that benefit children in Chicago. All we want to know now is who he is referring to when he says that his “ex looking back like a pillar of salt”.

JUDGE OLU STEVENS – LOUISVILLE, KY

Becoming a judge is no easy task. First, you have to earn a college degree. Next, you need to get a decent LSAT score. Next, you have to actually get into law school and become a good attorney. Only then can a person attain a spot on the bench. Judge Olu Stevens graduated from the prestigious Morehouse College, then went on the complete his juris doctoraBlack man judgete at George Washington University Law School. He was a circuit court judge for the 30th Judicial Circuit in Jefferson County (Louisville, Kentucky).

Judge Olu Stevens did something that most professionals wouldn’t dare do–he put his career on the line to stand up against white supremacy. Specifically, Judge Olu Stevens denied all-white juries from taking over his courtroom. It was a bold move and we appreciate him for the stance he took against racism. Of course, no one is perfect. Though mainstream media outlets have accused him of being a reverse-racist, his act was meaningful. Judge Olu Stevens, we applaud your efforts!

Much love to all the Black men out there walking in their purpose. We appreciate you all and we are happy to see you shine!

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08May/17
roc-a-natural

Roc-A-Natural Expo Reemerges to Empower NYC Naturalists With Confidence Mental Health Wealth & Pride

4th Annual Roc-A-Natural Hair, Health & Beauty Transform Your Life Expo returns to celebrate living in a Natural State of Mind. Some sponsors include Taji Mag, The Event Strategist, Nature’s Bounty, Raw Revolution, Miss Jessie’s, Pure Onyx Movement, Body Sculpt of New York, Natural Roots NYC, Michi Designs, Curls and Walk Through Gallery. Roc-A-Natural is held in the heart of Midtown Manhattan on Saturday, May 13th at The Watson Hotel, 440 West 57th Street, NYC.

roc-a-natural

With the recent rise in obesity, diabetes, hypertension and cancer health issues around the country, Yvette Onofre, Body Sculpt of New York will address the nurturing of a healthy body through the “Nutrition Workshop and the “Smoothie Operator” demonstration that will radiate confidence and beauty from within. This highly anticipated event will inspire and encourage an entire community to be proud of their inner beauty while seeking a more natural way of life. The expo will be held at The Watson Hotel, 440 West 57th Street, NYC 10019 on Saturday, May 13th from 10a.m. to 8p.m.

“True wealth comes when you first invest in your natural health at the Roc-A-Natural Expo” says Vincent Ferguson, President, Body Sculpt of New York.

roc-a-natural“Our mind is responsible for navigating our bodies through the world and having a healthy mentality is essential for building our self-identity. Roc-A-Natural stepped to the forefront to fill the need for an event that address the whole person” says SynChana Elkerson, who will be teaching the “What Goes Into A Healthy Mind?” Workshop.

Roc-A-Natural’s inaugural show in 2014 was a huge success with approximately 400 attendees and has continued to grow throughout the years. Now in 2017, with the move to Midtown Manhattan, they’re gearing up for an even larger audience. At this festival of all things natural, attendees will experience an insightful, informational and influential event that celebrates building self-esteem, natural beauty and empowers small business owners.

“This year’s R.A.N Expo is beyond living in a natural state of mind…it’s providing the blue print for building selfesteem through empowerment and Youth-Prenuers!” said Founder of Roc-A-Natural LLC, Dorcas Meyers.

“It’s been an honor to assist with cultivating and nurturing this flourishing Roc-A-Natural movement since its inception. Lack of self-esteem in our communities has contributed to sabotaging our quest for success in all aspects of life from our business aspirations to our personal relationships. The Roc-A-Natural Expo hopes to bridge the gap with thought provoking panel discussions, brainstorming healthy solutions and promoting positive reinforcement of self-identity for all” stated Vanessa Edwards-El, The Event Strategist.

“As the CEO and Hair Specialist of Essence of Beauty, EOB2 and Design Essentials products, I have been a part of the Roc-A-Natural movement in 2014 and 2015 and am looking forward to returning this year as the Pop-Up Salon. We will continue to assist with improving self-confidence through proper hair care and the workshop, “What You Need To Know To Roc-A-Natural and Protective Style.” stated Claudette Gyles.

roc-a-naturalNaturalist’s of all ages will gather to experience the talent and expertise of holistic healthcare practitioners, independent stylists, barbers, salons, bloggers, artists, performers and more. This interactive 1-day expo, is expected to attract approximately 500 participants. The Roc-A-Natural Expo offers a dynamic program designed to provide women, men and children with a vehicle to facilitate their natural journey and tackle the unprecedented challenges faced when embracing the natural lifestyle. The Expo serves as a unique forum where attendees can network, share experiences, and learn strategies from many of the nation’s leading experts on everything natural and most importantly have fun while doing it.

“Cultured Expressions is thrilled to return to Roc-A-Natural this year, where natural is more than just a hairstyle, it’s a Lifestyle — Come and share valuable information and inspiration!” said Lisa Shepard Stewart

The R.A.N Expo will feature an innovative and exciting Natural Hair Fashion Show. Industry professionals and fashion designers from the tri-state area will have the opportunity to showcase their fabulous work through the wonder of artful expression. During the show, the Roc-A-Natural Awards Ceremony will honor outstanding leaders who inspire excellence, ingenuity, effect change, a positive mindset and offer resources to live a successful and natural lifestyle.

Tickets to the R.A.N Expo are available for $15 for general admission, $10 for seniors/students and $100 group of 10 passes will receive an 11th complimentary pass. A few Vendor opportunities are still available at a discounted rate of $285.00. Vendors may confirm their participation by visiting the Roc-A-Natural website and completing the vendor application online.

For more information, journal ads or to register as a sponsor, vendor, community partner, affiliate, volunteer, ROC’Star model or health pavilion participant for the R.A.N Expo, visit www.rocanatural.com.

About Roc-A-Natural, LLC.

It’s All About Being In A Natural State Of Mind!

Roc-A-Natural is an organization and movement that is dedicated to building self-esteem through emphasizing the beauty of natural hair and the benefit of a natural lifestyle. This is accomplished by inspiring natural and protective hair styles at the Roc-A-Natural Hair Fashion Show, educating diverse generations on the importance of proper nutrition and exercise resulting in healthy hair, healthy body and healthy skin from head to toe. R.A.N offers access to a large variety of natural products and services that empower and encourage people to live in a natural state of mind. In addition, R.A.N provides a platform to promote entrepreneurship and tools for wealth building.

“Being Natural” is a choice… “Living Healthy” is a state of mind…” You can choose to be a natural and live a healthy lifestyle!” To follow Roc-A-Natural, engage and learn more, visit www.rocanatural.com, join the conversation at www.facebook.com/groups/rocanatural, follow on Twitter at twitter.com/rocanatural and Instagram @rocanatural.

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