All posts by Nay Marie

About Nay Marie

NayMarie is a published photographer and retoucher, based in New York City, who captures the essence of Black art and Black culture, pulling from her experience in multiple genres of photography and image editing! Her combined love for beauty and her community birthed the publication Taji Mag which embodies the positive Pan-African experience and encourages us to love ourselves as we are, not as the media or anyone else suggests we should be.

17Mar/20
coronavirus

Coronavirus: Providing Solutions, Not Panic, to Survive COVID-19

Let’s use social media to create solutions for the Coronavirus, not panic. [From Taji’s Editor]

• Introvert? Cool, we got this, just make sure you’re stocked.
• Extrovert? Is there someone you can stay with or who can stay with you? A staycation with the squad maybe?
• Are there elders, disabled folks, struggling families, etc in your neighborhood who you can grab extra groceries for?
• Any homeschoolers with lesson plans/activities/advice for parents at home with their children?
   – Kibibi Oyo will be giving free 15 min consultations to parents who want advice and a plan for their children to learn at home. She has both paid and free options that she can share. Just need to hit me up and schedule the FREE consultation. Schedule appointments here: https://professoroyo.as.me
 – Tamykah Anthony homeschools her children and has activities, printables, cool science experiments, etc. to complete with the little ones. She has also posted how to safely make your own cleaning products and hand sanitizer:
coronavirus    –
 Keisha Ragfitness provided this activity sheet:
coronavirus• Any child sitters willing to take on multiple children while some parents are still required to work (or who just need a break to prepare)?
* In light of the Gabriel Fernandez series and a status Will read to me, please keep an eye out for abused children whose only escape was school but are now forced to be home with their abusive guardian(s) all day.
• via MLN8NG: “As we are all aware, Coronavirus has been causing quite an impact on us economically, especially people of color who rely on 9-5 jobs as well as entrepreneurs; however, this does not have to be the case. We can start alleviating some of the felt pressures of the pandemic by very small steps.
In our research, we have learned that most people are having issues with child care services, hospice, online learning, and finding various tasks and activities to do while indoors. A potential solution lies within us. If you or someone you know, can provide childcare services or any other online learning services, take the time to set up a free or paid ticket event on MLN8NG so that we may be able to spread the information out and have a central location for Black and Brown faces to find options and alternatives in this growing online space. 
You can be of great impact to how we as a community both transition and expand within this new structuring. Take some time, gather your skillset(s) that you can offer and share them with us and spread the word. We would like to begin assisting with building a central location for people to gather information that can facilitate start and end dates, customers, as well as, and most importantly, those offering services. 
No skill is too big or too small. Do you stream classes? Do you stream gaming? Can you setup house visits and information teaching safety measures or stream them online? Are you a daycare provider? Anything you can do, place your information on the site so we can promote it and provide to our community. Simply click on the register button below and create an account on the site and then submit your event/stream/availability. Your friends, family, and those whose lives you will impact are already thanking you for it.”
• via Cory Ant: Buy stuff that will help your immune system and stuff that will last in case our country gets crazy and makes people stay in, instead of stocking up on cookies and meat products. Buy FRUITS like apples and oranges, VEGETABLES, GINGER, things that will be beneficial to your health and fighting off the coronavirus.
• Holistic Wellness advice from The Laya Center can be read at https://www.thelayacenter.com/blog/2020/3/16/elder.
Namaskar is also providing great products to boost your immune system fend off coronavirus, cancer, lupus, diabetes, high blood pressure, and more.
• via Krystal: Check on new moms who may need breastmilk/formula due to people stockpiling who may not be able to produce on their own.
• If you work/shop at a grocery/convenience store and notice necessities are restocked, make a post so people know where to go.
• via Jocelyn Sewell: While water is essential, people may want to purchase filters or filtered water bottles. Water can be found anywhere and with a filter, it’s drinkable.
Feel free to add solutions for the coronavirus in the comments. 🖤

07Dec/19

Barber Shop Chronicles Puts a Magnified Lens on the Diasporic Experience of Black Men

Barber Shop Chronicles

Inua Ellams. Portrait by Franklyn Rodgers.

Barber Shop Chronicles is one of the most ingenious plays I have watched in a long time. Finally, the Black man is not the villain, overly sexualized, the slave, or the savior for damaged Black women. He’s just human and is trying to figure this sh*t out like the rest of us! Originating in London and making it’s New York debut at BAM’s Harvey Theatre, this play is a real life look at the interpersonal relationships between men in our diasporic community. The barbershop is historically known to be the only place where our men have received any type of therapy. It’s where they discover who they are and how to treat one another and their community. Playwright/poet, Inua Ellams, and his all-male, 12-person cast do a phenomenal job of expressing true emotion and giving the rest of the world insight into what it’s like to be a melanated man. It plays in the humourous pool of sports, relationships, and race but then deep-dives into identity, fatherhood, generational trauma, and politics. 

Taking place in six different barber shops in London, Lagos, Johannesburg, Accra, Kampala, and Harare, Barber Shop Chronicles weaves us through the connections and similar experiences of these men despite their location. Each episode is sewn together with cultural music and dance that adds to the personality of the play. Every man is relatable on some level to someone you personally know or have come across. I attended the play with my partner, Will Focus. At the end he was in tears, which is a rare sight, so I couldn’t wait to hear his thoughts.

NayMarie (NM): Soooooo, what were your thoughts?
Will Focus (WF): The comedy was spot on. I noticed that they mixed several dialects from all over the diaspora. The fact that they were able to do it so seamlessly and still show that people were able to communicate in their respective dialects was awesome. I love that they drew the importance of speaking in a common tongue and having a dictionary that translates to Twi.

NM: What else?
WF: What I liked, on the political side, is the comparison between Winnie and Nelson [Mandela]. The fact that Winnie was the true hero then Nelson was brought in like how I view the Black pastors in America.
NM: As a pacifist?
WF: Yea, a pacifist. Someone who’s looking to put out that flame because it’s getting a little too hot for the European massives to handle. Or it’s a little too effective. What better way than to use her husband? I also liked the comparison between nigger and kaffir. What better way, specifically for the white audience who may not understand how significant that word is but can feel the weight when paralleled with the word nigger, to compare the use towards Africans. I like how they spoke of reclaiming our land and the one guy noted about how many of the Europeans had to die and it was retorted that African people died too. How they look out for the European but ignore the African lives lost. I love how it was reiterated that we took it BACK. It was ours to begin with and taken from us. I also like that they pointed out that the African slave trade was the biggest massacre, bigger than the Holocaust. I thought those dynamics, from a political perspective, from a social perspective, were excellent.

Barber Shop Chronicles

Tom Moutchi and David Webber. Photo by Julieta Cervantes.

NM: And the tears?
WF: As it suits me personally, what brought me to tears was the Father/Son relationship dynamic. How the family is expressed through their lens in London and Africa also happens to Black boys and men in America. It shows that this is a consistent issue among us. It was funny how the drunk/disheveled one who most people would judge, had the most information. Early on, he told of how he allowed European children to call him kaffir for a pound, or twice for two pounds and it upset all of the men in the shop. Later, we discover he did it because he lived with his grandparents, after being abandoned by his father, and they were poor. It’s how he made money to survive. When he was confronted with reconciling with his father, the emotional overflow led to the truth of the situation and that brought me to tears in terms of the reality behind that. Then it was the phrase of “boys growing up to be their fathers” and me having two sons. In one scene, they said, “a child will show you how to raise them.”
NM: Word, that spoke to me.
WF: That hit a chord for me because the difference in the dynamics I have to take with my two sons is VAST, even with my daughter. They have ALL shown me that I have to approach them differently. Then it showed the older generation of men who are kind of detached from emotion with their children and don’t realize the damage they have done.
NM: That beating them is the solution…
WF: And leaving it at that without ever reconciling for the damage that they’ve done. And that’s broad and sweeping.

We chatted for a solid hour, but we want you to see the play for yourself! I would love for it to be made into a film and played on kweliTV to reach a wider audience. In the meantime, follow Inua Ellams and Barber Shop Chronicles to see where they’re playing next. It is worth all of the awards it has already received and then some. You feel it in your soul and are elated to see these conversations given priority. 

Website | Instagram

17Nov/19

A Look into The New Black Vanguard: Photography between Art and Fashion – presented by BAM and Aperture

The New Black VanguardOn November 13th, Antwaun Sargent brought four of the artists from his book, The New Black Vanguard: Photography between Art and Fashion, to have an unapologetic conversation about photography, art, fashion, telling Black narratives from Black perspectives, and eliminating racial barriers. The discussion, hosted at BAM Rose Cinemas in Brooklyn, NY and powered by Aperture, was a candid look into the experiences of artists Arielle Bobb-Willis, Micaiah Carter, Tyler Mitchell, and Dana Scruggs.

“The New Black Vanguard is contemporary Black fashion photography that is inclusive and reflective of a wider world—in terms of skin color, body type, performativity of gender, and class—and also captures, celebrates, and expands the notions of beauty and agency.” — Antwaun Sargent

Candid Conversations

Antwaun first spoke with Dana Scruggs who was singing my life with her words – catering to a European aesthetic early in her career, then scraping that to uplift Black imagery and narratives, to self-publishing a magazine, to being vegan and joyous when clients provide the appropriate meals. I appreciated her representing the Black woman photographer perspective in totality. From people assuming that we’re not the photographer at all to second-guessing our methods to generally being 1 in 20+ to having to hold all other Black women photographers on our backs when we break a barrier, Dana spoke our truth. She became the first Black woman to ever photograph the cover of ESPN’s Body Issue in 2018, and, later that year, she became the first Black person to photograph the cover of Rolling Stone in its 50-year history.
 
Micaiah Carter blessed us with the importance of immortalizing the Black family through photography. He took us on a quick vintage journey that had everyone laughing and reminiscing. He noted the importance of capturing us as we are and how timeless we are. He has photographed the likes of Tracey Ellis Ross, Michael B Jordan, Taraji P. Henson, Ryan Destiny, and Pharell Williams. He spoke on how the industry will try to box you in if you photograph too many Black people. He’s proven he’s boundless though.
 
Arielle Bobb-Willis got real about the art of photography being a healing tool for mental health. The freedom to conceptualize an image from all aspects and then make it come to life can truly make you feel whole. She spoke on how it helps her work through depression and her intentionally capturing us in all forms, shapes, sizes, and moods. Her use of color and color blocking draws you into her world.
 
Tyler Mitchell came and took over for a minute. He did a monologue explaining each image from a slide show of his work. His mission was to showcase Black bodies existing, having everyday fun, and he smashed it. After his slide of a Flawless Beyonce, he played a video that hadn’t been premiered in New York. It was Black boys playing in the water, skateboarding, hula hooping, riding bikes, all at half speed so you’re really able to be immersed in their joy.
 
The panel gathered at the end for a bit of Q&A and then headed to BAMCafé for the book signing and to continue the conversation. 
About The New Black Vanguard Panelists

New Black Vanguard

(Photographer) Arielle Bobb-Willis, Union City, New Jersey, 2018, from The New Black Vanguard

New Black Vanguard

(Photographer) Micaiah Carter, Sheani, 2018, from The New Black Vanguard (Aperture, 2019)

New Black Vanguard (Photographer) Tyler Mitchell, Untitled (Twins II), New York, 2017, from The New Black Vanguard (Aperture, 2019)

New Black Vanguard

(Photographer) Dana Scruggs, Nyadhour, Elevated, Death Valley, California, 2019, from The New Black Vanguard (Aperture, 2019)

Antwaun Sargent is a writer and critic living and working in New York City. He has contributed essays to museum and gallery publications on Ed Clark, Mickalene Thomas, Arthur Jafa, Deborah Roberts, and Yinka Shonibare, among other artists. Sargent has lectured and participated in public conversations with artists at the Studio Museum in Harlem, Brooklyn Museum, MCA Denver, Art Gallery of Ontario, and Harvard and Yale universities. He has also co-organized a number of exhibitions, including The Way We Live Now at Aperture, Then and Now: Chase Hall and Cameron Welch at Jenkins Johnson Projects, and the traveling exhibition Young, Gifted and Black. His first book The New Black Vanguard: Photography between Art and Fashion released October 2019 and will be accompanied by a traveling exhibition.
Arielle Bobb-Willis was born and raised in New York City, with pit stops in South Carolina and New Orleans. Bobb-Willis has been using the camera for nearly a decade as a tool of empowerment. Battling with depression from an early age, Bobb-Willis found solace behind the lens and has developed a visual language that speaks to the therapeutic benefits of creativity. Her work can be seen in a group show in December 2019 at the Foam Photography Museum in Amsterdam.
Brooklyn-based photographer Micaiah Carter’s work is a singular alchemy of contemporary youth culture, fine art, and street style combined with his certainty that the simple act of representation can be a force for change. His work contains echoes of the Black Power movement and the work of Carrie Mae Weems, Viviane Sassen, Jamel Shabazz, and Alasdair McLellan. Carter is currently working on his first monograph, 95 48, inspired by photographs of his dad and his friends from the 1970s.
Tyler Mitchell is a photographer and filmmaker based in Brooklyn. His work has appeared in British Vogue, American Vogue, i-D, Dazed, and The New York Times. His commercial clients include Calvin Klein, Givenchy, and Converse. His first self-published book, El Paquete (2015), documents the architecture and skateboard scenes in Havana. He was the first Black photographer to shoot the cover of Vogue in 2018, and in 2019 he was included on Forbes’ “30 Under 30” list.
Dana Scruggs is a New York-based photographer, originally from the South Side of Chicago. In 2016 she launched Scruggs Magazine, a print publication dedicated to her vision of the male form, and in 2018 she had her industry breakthrough shooting ESPN’s Body Issue in 2018, becoming the first Black female photographer to photograph an athlete for the publication. Later that year, she became the first Black person to photograph the cover of Rolling Stone in its 50-year history. Her clients include Apple, Nike, The New York Times, GQ, and Essence.
Get your copy of The New Black Vanguard: Photography between Art and Fashion.
Photo by NayMarie for BAM

09Aug/16
Dr. Sebi

Dr. Sebi, His Nutritional Guide, & Why It’s Been Shunned

image23On August 6, 2016, a nutritional icon transitioned from this world. Dr. Sebi was announced deceased and the holistic food community felt the toll of the loss. Dr. Sebi was widely know for his healing guides through alkaline diets, including the most horrific of ailments. From AIDS, to cancer, to herpes, to lupus, Dr. Sebi was sought after to reverse and prevent diseases using his “African Bio Mineral Balance.” He returned bodies to their natural state of homeostasis via his natural alkaline plant food diet and herbs. This diet consists of only natural alkaline vegetables, fruits, nuts, alkaline grains, and legumes, which alkalize and remove mucus from the body, as well as natural alkaline herbs to clean the body’s cells on the cellular and intra-cellular levels.
The “health care” industry, aka Big Pharma, does not benefit from us curing and preventing diseases through our diet. They would rather try to discredit the holistic teachings of Dr. Sebi and other holistic practitioners because there is zero profit in us being healthy. Think of the tens to hundreds of the thousands of dollars per family spent to cure cancer and then the number of families affected by cancer. The more ailed we are, the more profitable the industry is.
I’ve personally experienced this. I have chronic eczema that reacts immediately to anything my body does not want. I don’t have the simple-rash-here-and-there type eczema. I have the bed-ridden, joints swollen, skin scaly and flaky, discoloration, hair falling out, type of eczema. I haven’t fully transitioned into an alkaline diet, but I’m 85% there. I’ve seen a significant change in something that’s been ailing me all of my life. From a child, I was on oral and topical steroids. They tried allergy shots (because I suffered from allergies all year round), every skin ointment and creme under the labs lights, and even UV treatments. They were all temporary surface solutions, and I didn’t realize all of the other damage being done to my body.
My boyfriend suggested I change my diet. He aimed to be vegan and I looked at him like he had 3 heads, but we slowly transitioned. We shopped for organic groceries and cut out frying all of our food. Then we removed meat and gluten. Then fish, and eventually dairy for an organic vegan, gluten free, soy free diet. I saw massive changes in my skin. My hair and eyebrows grew back stronger and fuller. My nails are healthy. My energy levels are higher, I am more attentive. When I went to my GYN for a regular checkup, she saw my skin discoloration (which at the time was a major improvement from where it was, but still had a ways to go), and she suggested I go towards the diet I was already on. Then she started suggesting medicines and I quickly informed her that I no longer take any medicine. Not even aspirin. I can relieve my pains through my diet and holistic care. As soon as she heard me say holistic, she flipped out and started going on about how they aren’t all natural and contain damaging properties. I responded that all of my food is plant-based with no additives, but that went in one ear and out of the other. I didn’t even waste my breath on reminding her of ALL of the damaging properties of medicine that lead to the situation where I currently was. It was eye-opening to see how someone I’m supposed to trust with the care of my body, knew that I needed to change my diet, but still wanted to pump me with pharmaceuticals that opposed my genetic makeup.
It’s this reason why we need to continue the legacy of Dr. Sebi and other nutritionists. An alkaline vegan raw food diet is best. The less heat brought to food, the more nutrients are retained and thus distributed throughout your body. Juicing is also a great way to gain nutrients faster because liquid immediately flows into your blood stream while solids need to be broken down via your intestines first. I am not a doctor or nutritionist, but I can speak on my testimony and those of others who have changed their diet in similar fashion.
The following information is via http://www.naturallifeenergy.com/alkaline-producing-mucus-reducing-nutrional-guide

Dr. Sebi’s approach to disease is disease:

“finds it genesis when and where the mucous membrane has been compromised. For example, if there is excess mucous in the bronchial tubes, the disease is Bronchitis; if it is in the lungs, the disease is Pneumonia; in the pancreatic duct, it is Diabetes; in the joints Arthritis.”

Dr. Sebi’s Approach To Eating

Spring Water!

Drinking plenty of spring water a day is essential to making this alkaline diet work. Dr. Sebi suggests drinking a  gallon of spring water a day, and health organizations suggest around the same amount.

The adult body consists of 70% water. All of the body’s metabolic functions need adequate amounts of water to function properly. Water removes waste from the body, cushions the joints and organs, and assists in the absorption of nutrients.

Many of herbs Dr. Sebi uses are diuretics and increase urination to remove toxins from the body. You must replace the water to support the healthy functioning of  the body.

Spring water is a natural alkaline water and it  best supports the hydration and natural ratio of electrolytes in the body.

Dr. Sebi’s nutritional guide doesn’t recommend microwaving because it damages the nutrients in food

I rather heat my food on the stove or in the oven, but I eat most of my food raw because raw food contains more nutrients than heated food whether microwaved or heated on the stove.

Dr. Sebi doesn’t recommend eating any foods not on the Dr. Sebi food list.

As I stated earlier, the Dr Sebi food list is very specific and excludes many whole-food plant-based foods.

Dr. Sebi recommends avoiding hybrid foods (plants and their fruits made by unnaturally cross-pollinating two or more plants) because they change the genetic structure, electrical composition, and pH balance to its detriment.

One such food is garlic, a plant food we are accustomed to eating but is not the best food to consume.

Dr. Sebi Food List

Vegetables

  • Amaranth greens – same as Callaloo
  • Avocado
  • Bell Peppers
  • Chayote (Mexican Squash)
  • Cucumber
  • Dandelion greens
  • Garbanzo beans (chick peas)
  • Green Banana –
  • Izote – cactus flower/ cactus leaf- grows naturally in California
  • Kale
  • Lettuce (all, except Iceberg)
  • Mushrooms (all, except Shitake)
  • Nopales – Mexican Cactus
  • Okra (removed)
  • Olives (and olive oil)
  • Onions
  • Purslane (Verdolaga)
  • Poke salad -greens
  • Sea Vegetables (wakame/dulse/arame/hijiki/nori)
  • Squash
  • Tomato – cherry and plum only
  • Tomatillo
  • Turnip greens
  • Watercress
  • Zucchini

Fruits

(No canned fruits or Seedless fruits)

  • Apples
  • Bananas – the smallest one or the Burro/mid-size (original banana)
  • Berries – all varieties- Elderberries in any form – no cranberries
  • Cantaloupe
  • Cherries
  • Currants
  • Dates
  • Figs
  • Grapes -seeded
  • Limes (key limes preferred with seeds)
  • Mango
  • Melons -seeded
  • Orange (Seville or sour preferred, difficult to find )
  • Papayas
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Plums
  • Prickly Pear (Cactus Fruit)
  • Prunes
  • Raisins -seeded
  • Soft Jelly Coconuts (and coconut oil)
  • Soursops – (Latin or West Indian markets)
  • Tamarind

Nuts & Seeds

(Includes nut & seed butters)

  • Brazil Nuts
  • Hemp Seed
  • Pine Nuts
  • Raw Sesame Seeds
  • Raw Sesame “Tahini” Butter
  • Walnuts

Oils

(New Section added by Dr. Sebi) Minimize the use of oils.

  • Olive Oil (Do not cook)
  • Coconut Oil (Do not cook)
  • Grapeseed Oil
  • Sesame Oil
  • Hempseed Oil
  • Avocado Oil

Spices – Seasonings

  • Achiote
  • Basil
  • Bay leaf
  • Cayenne – African Bird Pepper
  • Cilantro
  • Coriander
  • Dill
  • Habanero
  • Onion Powder
  • Oregano
  • Parsley
  • Powdered Granulated Seaweed (Kelp/Dulce/Nori – has “sea taste”)
  • Pure Sea Salt
  • Sage
  • Savory
  • Sweet Basil
  • Sweet Basil
  • Tarragon
  • Thyme

Sugars

  • 100% Pure Agave Syrup – (from cactus)
  • Date “Sugar – (from dried dates)

Alkaline Grains

  • Amaranth
  • Fonio
  • Kamut
  • Quinoa
  • Rye
  • Spelt
  • Tef
  • Wild Rice

Nutritional Guide | All Natural Herbal Teas

  • Alvaca
  • Anise
  • Chamomile
  • Cloves
  • Fennel
  • Ginger
  • Lemon grass
  • Red Raspberry
  • Sea Moss Tea

Dr. Sebi Organ Cleansing Herbs

The herbs listed above are only a few of the herbs Dr. Sebi uses in his products. I used them and a few more during my transition to an alkaline and mucus reducing diet, and now use for periodic maintenance.

Dr. Sebi’s office offers individual products to address specific conditions and therapeutic packages to address complex health issues. You should contact Dr. Sebi’s office (California: 310-838-2490) if you are not familiar with herbs and buying quality herbs.

Purchase Dr. Sebi’s products here.

Check here for a list of Dr. Sebi’s products and a description of the herbs they contain.

Check here for a list of Dr. Sebi’s therapeutic packages and a description of the herbs they contain.

The Dr. Sebi food list and nutritional guide is a roadmap to healing and reversing disease.

23Apr/16
prince

Prince Nelson Rogers: 1958 – Forever

At 1:05p I get a text from my longtime homie Shan that reads “WTF is up with these people saying my original Baby Daddy is dead!?!” I simply replied, “Nas??” half caring about internet rumors, especially when I’ve only been awake for 15 minutes. Awaiting her response I inadvertently check a facebook notification, hit the back button which led to my newsfeed, and lost all air from my body… No, God, Please… Not Prince…

I went to check the singular news source I rely on for death notices and they only confirmed “someone” died. Then, at 1:17p my King messaged me: “Hey baby. Prince died.” He was the first person to actually say it to me. A minute later my best friend called and whispered “Are you ok?” …”No…” We cried. Hung up. My King called, I was still crying, he just listened, only half understanding. I didn’t have the words to explain it to him at the time. I washed, briefly went to the gym, and cancelled the rest of my day.

I was too mentally numb to party like it’s 1999 alongside the rest of the Prince stans at the impromptu Spike Lee block party or with Quest Love at Brooklyn Bowl, so I stayed in bed. When I first realized it was official, I didn’t think being on facebook was a good idea, but I’m glad I hit the window accidentally. It was tough, but the out pour of love for Prince’s artistry has been so fulfilling. I’ve gotten to see a few clips I’ve never seen before and watched the globe bask in why I’ve loved him as far back as my memory travels… Throughout the day I received the messages I needed to use to explain why the loss of this particular icon crippled me.

 

0

@ElusiveJ explained it best!

 

2

It helped to know I wasn’t alone, like I so often felt when I spoke of Prince.

It also helped to laugh in between the blanket-soaking tears.

prince

prince

But of all, my heart was most moved by my King creating this piece for me… the tears burst through like a flood… The black and white version is in his Pan African coloring book, The Little Black Book. The colored piece is available as a print and t-shirt due to popular requests when he posted them.

prince theonewillfocus

prince theonewillfocus

My first facebook post read: “This sh*t is so unreal to me. I decided to go work more on [Taji] Mag to take my mind off of it and forgot I dedicated a page to him (it’s Vol 7, the theme is Afrofuturism, his Bday is June 7th and Vol 7 releases June 7th, etc), but now it has to be in memory of… I’m not ready.
Yesterday my old ipod finally died while I was listening to Insatiable (my fav song) and I was so momentarily pissed. If I only knew…”

I was devastated. I felt betrayed. But now… Now I’m listening to HITNRUN Phase One & Two imagining how his concerts would’ve been performing these songs so different from his 80s hits, yet still SO him.

prince

How I will remember him. Afro. Smiling. Protecting his 3rd eye. <3