All posts by Lindi Tshitlho

Lindi Tshitlho

About Lindi Tshitlho

"A girl crazy enough to think she can accomplish her conundrum of a dream." Lindi Tshitlho, Community & Culture | @muhlez Lindi Tshitlho is all about community empowerment. She travels around African townships to showcase their products, stories, and businesses to mainstream sectors for recognition. She is a contributing lifestyle and fashion writer, covering stories about African culture, cuisine and decor in and around South Africa.

27May/17

Lindi Roaming the Streets on Africa Day

Lindi Roaming the Streets on Africa Day

“RANTA E WELE”

by Thabiso Thabethe

The mural painted at a public park in Winterveld PTA, South Africa, titled‘ RANTA E WELE’ (meaning the rand has dropped)’ is his first politically inclined artwork and first non commissioned public artwork. The piece is not a lash at the current ruling party, the president for the political instability. “I was simply attempting to reflect the concerns of the people in our poverty stricken township. After the SA president reshuffled the cabinet we have witnessed a decline in the value of the South African rand and this follows criticism from all political parties, accompanied by a few marches and demonstrations from the general public.”

   

“The monochrome painting with a blood red for the injured and dying impala on the Rand, signifying the current state of affairs locally and nationally was a subtle yet effective way for me to be a mouthpiece for the people. I have used a spear to symbolize that the hurt to the Rand/ the country is done by one of the natives. The whole coin is still steel/silver material but the blood is ‘realistic’, because the value of the Rand is an idea which is generally accepted as a substance possessing value to pay for goods and services within the country… but its declining value has a very realistic backlash that the poor are not able to ignore. Taxi prices in Pretoria South Africa have gone up and that affects food prices and local businesses, so Winterveld people are facing difficulties to get by, hence the impala/springbok on the Rand (the prey representing ‘the people’) is turning its face backwards to express anguish and hopefully escape from the predator’s fatal spear throw.”

KausKulture is a Designer Brand that is primarily focused, but not limited to custom sock designs. KausKulture is inspired by the collective aspirations of the youth of South Africa through the expression of art in textile. It was formally established by two young black entrepreneurs Kabelo Moabelo and Marcus Prime Chabane, who wish to add value to the livelihood of our communities.

KausKulture aims to influence the fashion industry with its originality, spontaneity and class. The design element go against uniformity but still maintaining sophistication. “We have an unparalleled appreciation for attention to detail and cater for diverse and broad market.”  The company was established in 2015, when the spark to establish KausKulture as a movement started as a conversation and continues to grow as an instrument of change and artistic inspiration impact to our generation.

Kgomotso Neto Tleane

 A South African photographer with the mouldings of rural life and trimmings of fast paced city living. Born and raised in Ga-Maja, the Johannesburg based photographer creates imagery that effortlessly reflects both the grime and glory of the city he inhabits.
 
Known for his documentation of informal and underrated aesthetics, taxis and everyday people form a prominent feature in his work, whilst his collaboration with renowned graphic designer, Rendani Nemakhavhani in The Honey is testament to his strengths as a conceptual photographer.
 
Featured on various tv and radio stations, various local and international publications such as between 10and5, okayafrica, Asian Photography (India) and Radio Africa Magazine (Barcelona) among others for his work, Tleane along with Nemakhavhani were one of the participating artists in this year’s Fresh Produce category at the lauded Turbine Art Fair
 
African Art is a term typically used for the art of Sub-Saharan Africa. Often, casual, amateur observers tend to generalize “traditional” African art, but the continent is full of people, societies and civilizations, each with a unique visual culture. The definition may also include the art of the African Diasporas, such as the art of African Americans. Despite this diversity, there are some unifying artistic themes when considering the totality of the visual culture from the continent of Africa.
 
  
Africa is the world’s second-largest and second-most-populous continent. At about 30.3 million km2 (11.7 million square miles) including adjacent islands, it covers 6% of Earth’s total surface area and 20.4% of its total land area. With 1.2 billion people as of 2016, it accounts for about 16% of the world’s human population. One interesting fact about Africa that is truly amazing is that long before humans were around (the early Mesozioc Era), Africa was joined to other continents in a massive continent called Pangaea. Over millions of years this huge continent broke apart shaping the world landscape as we know it today in what has been referred to the continental drift. On this day 2017 May 25, we salute You Mama Africa.

#AFRICA RISE
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24Apr/17

Lindi Roaming the Streets with Ntomb’enhle Dolls and Lulasclan

Lindi Roaming the Streets with Ntomb’enhle Dolls and Lulasclan!

Ntomb'enhle Dolls

In Zulu, “Ntomb’entle” means beautiful girl. The Ntomb’enhle range represents just a few of our South African and neighbouring countries traditions.

Finally, South African cultural black dolls that children can identify with! Ntom’benhle Dolls is the concept and creation of Molemo Kgomo (46). This mother of two beautiful daughters brought the range into the market in 2005, after identifying the lack of pretty black dolls in the market which her daughters could relate to. Little did she know that in addressing this issue, that she would be answering the call of millions of other moms around the world, who wanted their children to have dolls that represents them. The dolls are beautiful girls as their name states. They have beautiful brown skin, brown eyes, short hair and curves. This is typical of a South African little black girl. In addition they celebrate the heritage of each of the South African cultures.

“BOTH MY DAUGHTERS ARE MY INSPIRATION, THEY ARE MY LIFE !!!!!!!!”

Ntomb'enhle Dolls

They are dressed in apparel representing the following 8 South African cultures:
Zulu
Sotho
Pedi
Swazi
Ndebele
Venda
Tsonga
Xhosa

“The goal with Ntomb’enhle Dolls is to provide little girls with a doll which they can see themselves in, and therefore start the process of redefining the definition of beauty in South African girls. The dolls can be played with by all races, as we see with white dolls. We believe that they will help to foster tolerance, understanding and friendship between children of different cultural backgrounds. We live in a diverse country and have much to celebrate!”

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“It has been along journey and has not ended, I will keep going at it as I still have so much I would like to do with the brand, the journey continues.”

Ntomb'enhle Dolls

Graphic Designer and Illustrator Bonolo Chepape, also the founder of LulasClan, manufactures and produces all products in Rustenburg, North West of South Africa. These designs are authentically created in-house. Material Scatter cushion designs are printed on 100% cotton twill using the latest digital sublimination printing technology. Designs are made according to individual specifications to create unique products with a personalised taste.

  Ntomb'enhle Dolls   “We specialise in textile design, illustration, interior decor & design.”

Ntomb'enhle Dolls

So she called this Journey Meet the other side of Africa, another side of Africa that is free from the negative perceptions of society but a place where colour plays in-between all the black and white lines that seem to define and divide us. “Let’s put colour into play this time in a positive light, in a merge of two styles and a new breed that form when Africa meets West and women come together to rise up together to reach the stars.”

Ntomb'enhle Dolls

When ‘I’ becomes ‘We’  that’s when we will succeed in building one another and supporting one another’s dreams and stories are passed on through generation and generations, stories that tell of amazing and inspirational women who helped to build an African mindset, that is all inclusive and creativity forms the unifying language.

Meet the other side of Africa is not just a collection of beautiful scatter cushions, it is Art, it is story telling, it is a movement and a collection with the aspiration of one day collaborating and sharing stories of women across all walks of life and celebrate all that society deems as imperfect, because in true reality imperfections are what makes us all beautiful, and unique. 

It starts with ‘I’ with an aspiration of becoming “we”, so if you would like to collaborate, and are a creative looking for a platform to showcase your talent, join the Clan, we all about creativity and bringing different parts together to form a whole. email your submissions to talent_colab@lulasclan.com 

“Our limited collection of well-crafted bespoke scatter cushions, are designed to celebrate woman and to tell their stories. Each scatter is inspired by a graphic illustration piece and is specially printed for a high quality finish. Let your home tell a story, celebrate it with this collection.”

MEET THANDO Meet Thando, she is made of love, she is the love that unites shapes and patterns whilst bringing all sweet pastel colours together.

MEET THULI A little attitude, pink lipstick, bold prints, and a huge ‘Fro’ sounds like nothing good oh! Thuli can’t live without.

MEET MBALI She blossoms like a wild flower, planted among the weeds, and just like spring comes with joy so does she.

MEET NALEDI Just like shooting stars, Naledi is one that’s hard to find. She lives a lucid dream and is determined to be much better, much brighter then she was yesterday.

MEET MAMA-AFRICA Mama Africa the mother of nature, and the salt of the earth, she is soft, nurturing and a strong rooted women.

“It’s not easy leaving your job in the pursuit of happiness and a life out of comfort and security, but this journey is only truly beginning and I am still yet to scrape and fall on my way to reaching a place where I can feel I am at home and free from the many fears of the unknown.”

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18Feb/17

Lindi Roaming the Streets with Artrepreneurs of Mzansi

ARTREPRENEURS ON THE LOOSE!!!

Artrepreneurs

Sibusile Xaba, born in Newcastle KZN and having to find music as a passion at an early age,  became engrossed in the art form regardless of circumstances. After completing matric (Grade 12), he decided to peruse music as a career and enrolled in a music college. With the knowledge acquired from college, he recognized a need to study further and expand his musical capacity. It was at this point when he enrolled into university to study jazz and major in jazz guitar.Artrepreneurs

This decision turned out to be a turning point in his career. It led to tours around the world with him playing his love for all sorts of people; young, old, political and apolitical. Furthermore, it honored and privileged him with opportunities to share a message with the countless people that he has met in his journey.

Artrepreneurs With constant practice, performing and connecting with different people, Sibusile has witnessed a continual growth in him as an individual and as a musician. It is a kind of growth that he values as important and worth sharing.

In addition to touring, Sibusile has worked with many different artists through session work, contributing as a composer and guitarist – both live and in studio. These endeavors have led to the creation of a lot of beautiful music with value that has not gone unnoticed.

Artrepreneurs   Artrepreneurs

Through his work Sibusile illustrates that Music is a collective effort; the more layers of sound put together in unison the greater the final piece. Furthermore, collaboration through music is a fundamental way of building unity within society and the community at large. The more artists that can come together and work together, the higher the standard of art will be. The more music is accessible to different communities, the better artists are sustained through their art.

Artrepreneurs

Resources, space and equipment will be easily shared…
Special information or comments: The Unlearning is the stripping of self from all indoctrination that the world has thought us and becoming one complete piece with thy self. The music we create is a harmonious massage of love, peace, happiness and equality for all.

Artrepreneurs

Brothers from the hood creating food for the soul.

Artrepreneurs

He goes by the name ‘Kabelo Khunou’, from The City of Sedibeng. He graduated from Wits University in 1999. This father of twins has traveled the world to pursue his career in the food industry. Creating food from the likes of chocolate art, fruit carvings, you name it!!!

Artrepreneurs Artrepreneurs Artrepreneurs Artrepreneurs

Artrepreneurs Life in the hood is not what it’s made out to be when you’re born with a creative mind and the passion for life. The aim is to utilize it to the best of your abilities and capture the hearts of many, while having fun. Who wants to wake up day after day to make someone else’s dreams come true when you can assemble your craft to make wonders. I salute people like Kabelo, BIG UP’S HUSTLER!!!

You don’t need a silver fork to eat good food. Food, in the end, in our own tradition, is something holy. It’s not about nutrients and calories. It’s about sharing. It’s about honesty. It’s about identity.

Food is our common ground, a universal experience.

Artrepreneurs

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17Feb/17
Knox Mahlaba

“Back from the Dead”- The Rising of the Spirit by Knox Mahlaba

“Back from the Dead” by Knox Mahlaba

The Rising of an African Spirit is a celebration of life, it’s different seasons, and the struggle to overcome. It is an anthology consisting of fifty poems; some poems are images of personal struggles, others visualize the celebration of love, and a few are odes to great leaders and historical reflections.

The single message this book intends to transfer to the reader is that a sense of self-love and appreciation does a world of good. Throughout the book, references are made to Africa with the sole intention of encouraging people, Africans on the continent, and across the Diaspora, to reflect on their rich identity, take responsibility for their self-concept, and to be proud of their heritage in order to inject a greater sense of self-worth and responsibility in their daily lives.

His poetry appears in the Kampala poetry anthology, which we’re launching during the Babishai Poetry Festival, August 26th to 28th at The Uganda Museum. Knox Mahlaba was born in Johannesburg, a proud Sowetan who has had the opportunity to live in different countries as a result of circumstance beyond his control and a desire to obtain an education. A copywriter by trade, he has worked for a multinational advertising company and with international brands. When writing wasn’t paying the bills, he supplemented his income with business initiatives and speaking engagements.

Moving from South Africa to Swaziland after the 1976 Soweto Riots and growing up in exile, he studied at a South African university and then overseas. Studying in America was an eye opener and afforded him the opportunity to interact with Africans from different countries. He had many Ugandan friends in the States and even visited the Ugandan embassy there. Writing about Kampala was like a home coming because as a child Uganda was in the news for the wrong reasons. Fortunately, his friends exposed him to another side of the story.

He has one published collection, Back From The Dead: The Rising of an African Spirit, available via Amazon and various online bookstores. He is currently working on his next book and intends on setting up a program to encourage writing and reading among the youth. As a Pan Africanist, his passion is sowing unity among Africans on the continent and abroad.

Writing is a release and something that comes naturally. Writing was a hobby that became a copywriting job and ultimately he began writing for a greater purpose. Mahlaba writes poetry to highlight the numerous conundrums that life offers. He prefers to relay life’s questions to readers to provoke possible answers. He also writes because he thinks African people should take the lead in defining the African experience and shaping young minds toward positive behavior.

“Soweto is a big place, where people are known by their nicknames, names related to their specialty. You really have to stand out to be recognized. It’s a place that thrives on confidence and big dreams. 1976 Student Uprisings define Soweto, the people are resilient and forever seek creative ways to achieve the best results and be the best.”

He has always been fascinated by words. “As a kid I disliked reading fiction because the characters and the plot undermined the aspirations of black people by misrepresenting them; I started reading newspapers from the age of five. It was only after reading ‘I Write What I Like’ by Steve Biko and the African Writer’s Series that I realized that there was only one way to alter the literature landscape, writing and detailing the black experience from a sympathetic perspective without being patronizing.”

Being the cultural melting pot of Johannesburg, its multicultural environment encourages multilingualism and develops interest in other culture, breeding acceptance. Soweto teaches you to be universal by removing ethnocentrism {tribalism} from the mind-set.

“I write about everything, everything that touches and affects the African soul – politics, social issues, and love. The media often portrays Africans as an unloving people, pure because they define love from a western perspective.”

“Universal topics, love, romance, life challenges, and being an African, I also home in on the effects of slavery, colonialism, tribalism and apartheid. We no longer love ourselves and our ways because of systematic brainwashing!”

Piece of the past, highlights the need for Africans to rediscover themselves and rebuild the family unit. I often say, poets take credit for the work of angels. The best poems won’t let you sleep, the words will wake you if you’re asleep, stop you from sleeping if awake, stop you from doing something else until the poem has form. My poems write themselves from my experiences first hand and second hand interactions.”

All the poems are inspired by Africa, half deal with the spirit, a quarter celebrates love in its various guises, and the another quarter focuses on Africa and the plight of her descendants wherever they may reside.

nature’s revenge.

Singing shosholoza……………….
……………………………………….
A ravaged ecosystem bears the blame
Drought the diagnosis
The men ascend the mountain
Unable to pray for rain
The boulders of culture excavated
Unable to pray in their own language
Pain passed from generation to generation
The mountain laughs

Excerpt from ‘nature’s revenge’

“Different strokes for different folks, I prefer to focus on the words, the words are meant to move you and not the costume or stage devices. History is written by the victor.”

“Poetry offers a balanced narrative of events. I would agree that the poet, more spiritually equipped to portray the truth, pity poets don’t have the resources given to historians. For example, a historian will toe the party line when dealing with ethnic violence, whereas the poet will focus on the loss of human life. The historian is only accountable to the government of the day; the poet is answerable to the ancestors and has to be accountable for an eternity.”

Some of his unpublished work is available on his blog Nativedrum. You can interact with him on various social media platforms, including Facebook and Google+.

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16Feb/17
Social Yaruna

Lindi Roaming the Streets at the Social Yaruna

In this edition of Lindi Roaming the Streets, Lindi visits the Social Yaruna!

“CREATIVITY IS A WILD MIND AND A DISCIPLINED EYE”

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Social YaRuna is an out of the box, diverse and artistic movement aimed at providing a platform to mold and nature future leaders of the entertainment world. “Ya Runa”, which means ours, aims at creating unity among the artists as well as unifying art lovers with those that chose to pursue a career in the world of entertainment.  The idea of YaRuna is to draw in the masses and teach them knowledge of how broad the art/entertainment industry is by bringing in a diverse group of individuals under one roof who will each bring in their own element; ultimately giving a platform for emerging artists to grow as artists as well as make a living from their crafts.

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YaRuna, established in September 2016, is hosted every first Saturday of the month and is co-owned by Thabang Modupo & Thobile Nhlapo.

These emerging events co-ordinators & stylist/image consultants are also qualified Business Analysts. Born and raised in the east of Johannesburg (born in Hillbrow, resided in Tembisa (tshepo extention) till the age of 7, then moved to Kempton Park in 1999.

They were also recently a Top 15 finalist in the global blogger style challenge, being the only African to have been a part of the competition.

“What defines me is my capability to adapt well to ever changing circumstances in my life, constantly transitioning from what society’s perception of what a young black man should look like as well as how a young entrepreneur like myself should dress or behave in order to be successful. I don’t conform to the norms of society hence I don’t want to restrict myself to just settling for the regular 9-5 lifestyle we as a black community have been trained since birth to take up, where we slave day in a day out only to make millions (daily) for someone else’s company only to earn peanuts only once a month.”

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It’s not everyday that society is gifted with a radical youth, who is not afraid to dance to her own tune or help liberate the minds of other youth around her. This 23 year old photographer from Sebokeng, Vaal, began using her photography career three years ago, as a self-expressive art that she now wishes to share with the world. She describes her photography as a form of “Expressionism”- as most of her work carries subliminal meaning and weight from within!

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Thobile has photographed South African stars, including AKA, Kelly Khumalo, and Mandoza. “I hope to be given an opportunity to further develop my skills and more importantly, to working with people I can learn from.”

“SPIRIT IS HER NAME”

spirit

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“You can not use up creativity, the more you use, the more you have.”

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“The shoe cobbler”

“The Shoe Cobbler” is a customization business that was founded by 3 young entrepreneurs, Tshepang Ramoji, Thabo Kholoane & Sabata Mpholo who identified and realized how the local trend where they’re from was so behind, so they re-introduced a forgotten street culture (sneaker customization) in the Vaal.

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TSC basically gives all worn out sneakers a second chance by re-modifying them and giving them a brighter and better colour to match the look you’ve always had in mind.

•The vision of TSC is to be known and recognized internationally because of the creativity we all have to offer.
•Our mission is to provide high quality services that are trustworthy, join every well known markets that display art, and, most of all, enhance our entrepreneurial excellence.
 
IG-@the_shoe_cobbler
FACEBOOK – Tshepang Samson Ramoji

CELL no.- 0818790398

FACEBOOK – Thabo Lovey Koloane
CELL no-0603497163
 
FACEBOOK – Sabata Sabo Mpholo
CELL no.-0799882973
Hector Pieterson (1963 – 16 June 1976) became the subject of an iconic image of the 1976 Soweto uprising in South Africa when a news photograph by Sam Nzima of the dying Hector being carried by another student while his sister ran next to them, was published around the world. He was killed at the age of 13 when the police opened fire on protesting students. For years, 16 June stood as a symbol of resistance to the brutality of the apartheid government. Today, it is designated Youth Day — when South Africans honour young people and bring attention to their needs. #FEESMUSTFALL
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Live painting
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Soulful sounds by Sio
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Live Body Painting 
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The Royal Vibrations is a marimba group that has a percussive musical combination of marimba, djembe, dance and vocals. The band comprises of ten Members who share common roots with different social and cultural orientations. The group represents the nicest melodies ever found in the musical history of mankind and is based in the heart of Johannesburg, Hillbrow (at the Hillbrow Theatre).

The Royal Vibrations fuses traditional music with western sound effects and a modernized interpretation of time, space and circumstance. The band plays a variety of musical styles that include Southern Africa traditional songs, Afro-fusion, jazz, house, gospel, afro-pop and classical sounds. Members of the band respectively are rich in experience of the entertainment industry and have performed on both local and international music festivals and concerts.

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To date, the experience within the band blends into a unique acoustic feel with an essential rhythmic touch that refreshes, heals and gives an uplifting sensation that restores our sense of dignity and self-pride. The Royal Vibrationz works with a number of session musicians from all over South Africa, and has collaborated with international live bands on various occasions, including Melita Matsinhe based in Norway. The Royal Vibrations is currently the holders of the best marimba band in South Africa’s National Marimba Festival 2013 and the International Marimba & Steelpan Festival 2013. The great band has a live audio recording they did in 2013 titled “The Journey” That includes cover versions from the great African and international musicians and some of their own compositions. “We are here to give you the best marimba music at festivals, concerts, graduation ceremonies, corporate functions, parties and weddings.” They offer the following services:

Live Marimba Band (Afro-jazz, contemporary jazz, house, reggae, soul, afro-soul, RnB)

Take a chill pill and unwind with a game of Pack Man!!!
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“Your attitude is like a box of crayons that colour your world. Constantly colour your picture gray, and your picture will always be bleak. Try adding some bright colors to the picture by including humour, and your picture begins to lighten up.”

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Midrand Social Squad
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PHOTO CRED:@jay_dundidit      
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04Jan/17
Vernac

Celebrating our Heritage in Vernac!!!

Celebrating our Heritage in Vernac!Vernac

The everyday language spoken by people as distinguished from the literary language. Railways Cafe is of an indigenous building style using local materials and traditional methods of construction and ornament especially as distinguished from academic and historical architectural styles. Every country has its peculiar turns of phrase – quirks that give local languages flavor, color, and character. But unless you’re a native speaker, local slang can be tricky to grasp, let alone use. South Africa, with its 11 official languages, is blessed with a rich slang culture that can be quite daunting for foreign visitors – heck, even some residents flounder when faced with some of the more obscure lingo. “Heterogeneous We Are”

Railways Café, based in Irene Pretoria, is one of the most diverse restaurants enriched with culture and the spirit of UBUNTU.  On this day we celebrated the underground musicians that go unnoticed, yet produce the most powerful, rich sounds of Africa. People from all parts of the globe came through to honor these beautiful souls.Vernac

Vernac  Vernac

We spotted Mr Sibabalwenathi Mfabe, writer of Azania 1236″

The story of Azania continues in the year 1236 in the territory slightly south, and then into the north and its east in what we know today as KwaZulu Natal. In Azanian times no such place had existed at the time of the events that begun in 1234 and continued two years later. Here in these lands, lush and well vegetated, had been brought to order and control by the well liked custodian Cagn, under instruction and supreme protection of Tsui-Goab, Azania’s Arch Custodian. The book will be launched at one of the Taji Night’s book reading events soon.Vernac

“DO NOT SAY YOU WERE NOT WARNED”

 Vernac             Vernac             Vernac

All artwork sold is exclusively hand made to suit your individual desire by;

Sam

Biggie

Tendai

Felix

#Proudly African

Vernac Vernac Vernac

This wall is situated just outside the restrooms for individuals to write what they want to do to change the world. I found that very fascinating.

Vernac

“I want to change the world by always trying my best in everything I do and by being an outstanding ambassador for our nation, everywhere and under all circumstances, create an environment that will enable us to fulfill our vision of making our nation exceptional.” -Muhlez

“There is always something to do. There are hungry people to feed, naked people to clothe, sick people to comfort and make well. And while I don’t expect you to save the world I do think it’s not asking too much for you to love those with whom you sleep, share the happiness of those whom you call friend, engage those among you who are visionary and remove from your life those who offer you depression, despair and disrespect.” – Nikki Giovanni

Last month, Taji hosted an event to honour our Queens, and with that came a gift hamper sponsored by ShowbizAfrika, Muhlez Catering and Projects and Peo Information Technologies. This hamper went to the Queen who is and has always been the light in underprivileged communities, and selflessly so.

“My dream is to retire to my very own orphanage.”

Vernac Vernac

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The children of Setlopo, a small village in Mahikeng north west of South Africa, hand printed this sheet in her honour.

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This woman has been sharing her income with communities for over twenty years, and has never asked for help doing so. We found that very touching and not to mention inspiring and heart-warming.

She carries five (5) degrees of different sectors, yet she chose to teach ONLY in rural settlements, because she believed it was her calling.

“YOU WILL NEVER INFLUENCE THE WORLD BY TRYING TO BE LIKE IT.”

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10Sep/16
Fifty Shades of Duku

“Fifty Shades of Duku” is a Must Have for Headwrap Lovers

Ofentse “Princess Ofee” Maluleke is the CEO of Taji Holdings and author of Fifty Shades of Duku. Taji is a Swahili word for CROWN. The company is focused on manufacturing and distributing natural hair and skin products while teaching Queens how to take care of their crowns. She also has a relentless love affair with head wraps and began teaching others how to wrap in 2013 on her Youtube channel.

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Ofee was born and raised in Empangeni  (Kwa-Zulu Natal), South Africa, ensuring that she got an all-round South African experience and that she could speak at least 5 languages. Her love for entrepreneurship began in high school where she was nicknamed “the popcorn lady” as she sold popcorn during break times for pocket money. She continued to sell other items such as beaded jewelery and muffins all the way through to university.

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The way that African women wear their duku’s is significantly different to the way other ethnicities wear theirs.  Instead of tying the fabric below the chin or at the nape of the neck African women tie it on the crown of the head or on the sides and tuck in the fabric in the wrap leaving the face and neck exposed. This ensures the head is puled upwards and the features of the face  are highlighted. In other words, an African woman wears her duku as she would a crown.

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“My life purpose is to inspire, heal and help African Queens to look and feel beautiful and be their authentic selves for God’s glory through my products, seminars, blogging and vlogging online.”

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In this book, Ofee will showcase 50 different ways to tie a Duku step-by-step.

Headwraps (Duku) hold a significant role in the history of African women all over the continent and the diaspora. The tradition has been passed through the generations and has never gone out of fashion. Duku’s have been historically worn by both men and women of all races but, in recent times it has become associated almost solely with women of African decent.

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Among other incredible works, she also sells locally produced organic body, lip and hair products.

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Many thanks to:

 @FlashingLitesPhotography

@TajiShop

@Marabouess

@papi9525

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09Sep/16
https://tajimag.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/images-26.jpg

Lindi Roaming the Streets in Celebration of Our “Imbokodos”

In this edition of Lindi Roaming the Streets, Lindi celebrates our “Imbokodos” (Rocks/Women)!                                                                   

“Take a girl to the dance Campaign”

                                                           Agwata-Girls-Education-Initiative-mtg-early-apr2014-web  

Because every girl is a princess, they deserve that one night to celebrate their hard earned work. Rapunzel is a bit more relatable than the other princesses, especially because she doesn’t even know that she’s a princess until the very end. I like to think of her as the bohemian princess, as she’s barefoot and living in a tower. She paints and reads… She’s a Renaissance woman.

We are earnestly persuading all of our loving Queens out there to donate their matric dresses, and make someone’s prom night one they never imagined. This initiative gives education a meaning in rural and underprivileged communities, as they can only dream of nights like this.

This campaign runs from  01 August 2016 to 01 August 2017, in honour of all the hard working princesses that never gave up despite the obstacles that barred them from all angles, for they are our future QUEENS.

Imbokodos

                                                                  “Let’s take a girl to the dance, shall we?”

Please contact details below for more details and assistance.

Your donations are highly appreciated, and many thanks in advance.

IG:@muhlez

FB: Lindiwe Lee Tshitlho

Email: lindi@tajimag.com

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30Aug/16
Pretoria High School

Pretoria High School for Girls Faces Fury After Black Pupils Told to ‘Straighten Hair”

2African pupils from Pretoria High School for Girls in South Africa are finally holding their school to account for racism. #StopRacismAtPretoriaGirlsHigh was trending on social media on Monday (29/08/2016). Videos and photographs of pupils protesting at the school‚ one of the pupils sporting an afro‚ went viral.

The students say that they have raised complaints about the institutional culture and racism at the school in the past, but they have been told that their focus on race and politics is the reason why there is no black student among the top 10 achievers.

After protesting over the weekend against the school’s code of conduct, which instructs them to chemically straighten their hair, the girls held their posters high on Monday while many of them defiantly kept their hair natural. When the bell rang, some of the protesters made their way back to class, but a few of the students walked behind the MEC of Pretoria.

As they walked behind the MEC, they raised their fists in the air saying the “time has come” and “it’s been long enough” in reference to how long they had been fighting against racism at the school.

A student detailed how a teacher had told her to tie her dreadlocks in a way that would fit into the school’s view of tidiness. She tried to explain that her dreadlocks were too heavy and cut into different lengths so a hairband would not work. Her teacher put her in front of a mirror after class and told her to fix it.

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“She instructed me to fix myself as if I was broken,”

“My hair is natural and connected to my roots. They are not braids, they are roots.”

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A powerful image of a young girl in school uniform standing up to a man with her arms crossed above her head has gone viral. Her name is Zulaikha Patel. And the image of her defying the policing of Black bodies has become iconic. Zulaikha’s actions might have been directed at Pretoria High School for Girls, but her story resonates with many others.

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“SCALP FOR YOU”

I burn my scalp for you
To assimilate these strands into your world
I burn my scalp for you
To temper the African that flows through each follicle
I burn my scalp for you
To feed each root with the toxicity of your prejudice
I burn my scalp for you
For my afro may not block your worldview of me

I burn my scalp for you
To straighten the kinks out of my Nubian character
I burn my scalp for you
So that my Blackness may be obedient before you
I burn my scalp for you
So that these now timid strands lay in the grip of your elastic band
I burn my scalp for you
Lest these nappy curls stand up too much in defiance

You see, I have already burned everything else about me in your racist space
My melanin skin
My mother tongue
My culture
My crops on land you stole

It matters not that you have never burned your scalp for me
But you have policed my Blackness for too long

So now I refuse to burn my scalp for you
No longer will I burn within an ember of my authentic me
As I raise my fist past this mane of matted glory
You WILL accept me with my “kaffir hare”!

by Sean Burke

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27Aug/16
Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

A Prestigious Event in Honour of our Queens: Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

Music Fashion QueendomsTaji Mag, together with ShowbizAfrica and HardRock Café SA, hosted one of the most prestigious events in honour of our Queens: Music, Fashion, & Queendoms. Women from all walks of life came together to honour one another’s crafts in the creative space.

“Africans must change their mind and actions. The keys to building your continent depends on your will-power, persistent effort and action towards self-liberation.”
— Lailah Gifty Akita

There were motivational talks, book readings, showcasing of local brands, and of course the night wouldn’t end without a prize.

This night was supported by the likes of:

Author of ‘Sigh the Beloved Country’ Bongani Madondo,

Radio Personality, Lebo Magolego

CEO of Malose Communications, Mr J

Music Fashion Queendoms  Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

 

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

An array of fresh talent currently pushing their way towards their dreams, entertained the guests & supporters of this initiative, many incorporating a tribute to the Queens. The depth & variation of the rising creative talent, the aim is to nurture, was showcased by:

*Thabiso Thabethe

*Marley Bloo

*Queen Ofee

*House of Khalid Couture

*Queen Ink

*BlackDiamond

*KausKalture

*Dj

* Sinesipho Ngemntu

* Sabelo Moya

* Sphephelo Dludlu

* Kwanda Mchunu

 Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

‘Marley Bloo’ on vocals.

Hard Rock Cafe, Nelson Mandela Square, was a fitting venue with memorabilia displayed from various musical legends, giving some of these new artists a first taste of performing in an upscale venue.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

‘Dj Khanyi’ on the decks.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

Model and singer ‘BlackDiamond’

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

Our lovely queen from the audience for the Duku demonstration.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

‘Queen Ofee’ with her Organic products from, Taji Shop SA.

Here’s to the crazy ones… the misfits… the rebels… the trouble makers… the round pegs in the square holes… The ones who see things differently- they’re not fond of rules… You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can’t do is ignore them because they change things… They push the human race forward, and while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

‘The Khalid Sisters’ rocking their Duku’s.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

‘Thabiso Thabethe’ on the strings.

If we achieve a richer culture, rich in contrasting values, we must recognize the whole gamut of human potentialities, and so, weave a less arbitrary social fabric, one in which each diverse human gift will find a fitting place.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

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