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Fifty Shades of Duku
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“Fifty Shades of Duku” is a Must Have for Headwrap Lovers

Ofentse “Princess Ofee” Maluleke is the CEO of Taji Holdings and author of Fifty Shades of Duku. Taji is a Swahili word for CROWN. The company is focused on manufacturing and distributing natural hair and skin products while teaching Queens how to take care of their crowns. She also has a relentless love affair with head wraps and began teaching others how to wrap in 2013 on her Youtube channel.

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Ofee was born and raised in Empangeni  (Kwa-Zulu Natal), South Africa, ensuring that she got an all-round South African experience and that she could speak at least 5 languages. Her love for entrepreneurship began in high school where she was nicknamed “the popcorn lady” as she sold popcorn during break times for pocket money. She continued to sell other items such as beaded jewelery and muffins all the way through to university.

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The way that African women wear their duku’s is significantly different to the way other ethnicities wear theirs.  Instead of tying the fabric below the chin or at the nape of the neck African women tie it on the crown of the head or on the sides and tuck in the fabric in the wrap leaving the face and neck exposed. This ensures the head is puled upwards and the features of the face  are highlighted. In other words, an African woman wears her duku as she would a crown.

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“My life purpose is to inspire, heal and help African Queens to look and feel beautiful and be their authentic selves for God’s glory through my products, seminars, blogging and vlogging online.”

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In this book, Ofee will showcase 50 different ways to tie a Duku step-by-step.

Headwraps (Duku) hold a significant role in the history of African women all over the continent and the diaspora. The tradition has been passed through the generations and has never gone out of fashion. Duku’s have been historically worn by both men and women of all races but, in recent times it has become associated almost solely with women of African decent.

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Among other incredible works, she also sells locally produced organic body, lip and hair products.

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Many thanks to:

 @FlashingLitesPhotography

@TajiShop

@Marabouess

@papi9525

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Lindi Roaming the Streets in Celebration of Our “Imbokodos”

In this edition of Lindi Roaming the Streets, Lindi celebrates our “Imbokodos” (Rocks/Women)!                                                                   

“Take a girl to the dance Campaign”

                                                           Agwata-Girls-Education-Initiative-mtg-early-apr2014-web  

Because every girl is a princess, they deserve that one night to celebrate their hard earned work. Rapunzel is a bit more relatable than the other princesses, especially because she doesn’t even know that she’s a princess until the very end. I like to think of her as the bohemian princess, as she’s barefoot and living in a tower. She paints and reads… She’s a Renaissance woman.

We are earnestly persuading all of our loving Queens out there to donate their matric dresses, and make someone’s prom night one they never imagined. This initiative gives education a meaning in rural and underprivileged communities, as they can only dream of nights like this.

This campaign runs from  01 August 2016 to 01 August 2017, in honour of all the hard working princesses that never gave up despite the obstacles that barred them from all angles, for they are our future QUEENS.

Imbokodos

                                                                  “Let’s take a girl to the dance, shall we?”

Please contact details below for more details and assistance.

Your donations are highly appreciated, and many thanks in advance.

IG:@muhlez

FB: Lindiwe Lee Tshitlho

Email: lindi@tajimag.com

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Pretoria High School
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Pretoria High School for Girls Faces Fury After Black Pupils Told to ‘Straighten Hair”

2African pupils from Pretoria High School for Girls in South Africa are finally holding their school to account for racism. #StopRacismAtPretoriaGirlsHigh was trending on social media on Monday (29/08/2016). Videos and photographs of pupils protesting at the school‚ one of the pupils sporting an afro‚ went viral.

The students say that they have raised complaints about the institutional culture and racism at the school in the past, but they have been told that their focus on race and politics is the reason why there is no black student among the top 10 achievers.

After protesting over the weekend against the school’s code of conduct, which instructs them to chemically straighten their hair, the girls held their posters high on Monday while many of them defiantly kept their hair natural. When the bell rang, some of the protesters made their way back to class, but a few of the students walked behind the MEC of Pretoria.

As they walked behind the MEC, they raised their fists in the air saying the “time has come” and “it’s been long enough” in reference to how long they had been fighting against racism at the school.

A student detailed how a teacher had told her to tie her dreadlocks in a way that would fit into the school’s view of tidiness. She tried to explain that her dreadlocks were too heavy and cut into different lengths so a hairband would not work. Her teacher put her in front of a mirror after class and told her to fix it.

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“She instructed me to fix myself as if I was broken,”

“My hair is natural and connected to my roots. They are not braids, they are roots.”

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A powerful image of a young girl in school uniform standing up to a man with her arms crossed above her head has gone viral. Her name is Zulaikha Patel. And the image of her defying the policing of Black bodies has become iconic. Zulaikha’s actions might have been directed at Pretoria High School for Girls, but her story resonates with many others.

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“SCALP FOR YOU”

I burn my scalp for you
To assimilate these strands into your world
I burn my scalp for you
To temper the African that flows through each follicle
I burn my scalp for you
To feed each root with the toxicity of your prejudice
I burn my scalp for you
For my afro may not block your worldview of me

I burn my scalp for you
To straighten the kinks out of my Nubian character
I burn my scalp for you
So that my Blackness may be obedient before you
I burn my scalp for you
So that these now timid strands lay in the grip of your elastic band
I burn my scalp for you
Lest these nappy curls stand up too much in defiance

You see, I have already burned everything else about me in your racist space
My melanin skin
My mother tongue
My culture
My crops on land you stole

It matters not that you have never burned your scalp for me
But you have policed my Blackness for too long

So now I refuse to burn my scalp for you
No longer will I burn within an ember of my authentic me
As I raise my fist past this mane of matted glory
You WILL accept me with my “kaffir hare”!

by Sean Burke

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Music, Fashion, & Queendoms
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A Prestigious Event in Honour of our Queens: Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

Music Fashion QueendomsTaji Mag, together with ShowbizAfrica and HardRock Café SA, hosted one of the most prestigious events in honour of our Queens: Music, Fashion, & Queendoms. Women from all walks of life came together to honour one another’s crafts in the creative space.

“Africans must change their mind and actions. The keys to building your continent depends on your will-power, persistent effort and action towards self-liberation.”
— Lailah Gifty Akita

There were motivational talks, book readings, showcasing of local brands, and of course the night wouldn’t end without a prize.

This night was supported by the likes of:

Author of ‘Sigh the Beloved Country’ Bongani Madondo,

Radio Personality, Lebo Magolego

CEO of Malose Communications, Mr J

Music Fashion Queendoms  Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

 

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

An array of fresh talent currently pushing their way towards their dreams, entertained the guests & supporters of this initiative, many incorporating a tribute to the Queens. The depth & variation of the rising creative talent, the aim is to nurture, was showcased by:

*Thabiso Thabethe

*Marley Bloo

*Queen Ofee

*House of Khalid Couture

*Queen Ink

*BlackDiamond

*KausKalture

*Dj

* Sinesipho Ngemntu

* Sabelo Moya

* Sphephelo Dludlu

* Kwanda Mchunu

 Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

‘Marley Bloo’ on vocals.

Hard Rock Cafe, Nelson Mandela Square, was a fitting venue with memorabilia displayed from various musical legends, giving some of these new artists a first taste of performing in an upscale venue.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

‘Dj Khanyi’ on the decks.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

Model and singer ‘BlackDiamond’

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

Our lovely queen from the audience for the Duku demonstration.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

‘Queen Ofee’ with her Organic products from, Taji Shop SA.

Here’s to the crazy ones… the misfits… the rebels… the trouble makers… the round pegs in the square holes… The ones who see things differently- they’re not fond of rules… You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can’t do is ignore them because they change things… They push the human race forward, and while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

‘The Khalid Sisters’ rocking their Duku’s.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

‘Thabiso Thabethe’ on the strings.

If we achieve a richer culture, rich in contrasting values, we must recognize the whole gamut of human potentialities, and so, weave a less arbitrary social fabric, one in which each diverse human gift will find a fitting place.

Music, Fashion, & Queendoms

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Lindi Roaming the Streets | Soweto Street Culture Arts Festival
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Lindi Roaming the Streets of The Soweto Street Culture Arts Festival

In this edition of Lindi Roaming the Streets, Lindi explores South Africa’s Soweto Street Culture Arts Festival.

#AfricaMonth

“History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but, if faced with courage, need not be lived again.” 

Maya A.

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SOWETO STREET CULTURE ARTS FEST

Lindi Roaming the StreetsThe Soweto Street Culture Arts Festival #SSCAFest2016 is proudly South African with authentic local street culture, live Contemporary Jazz & Hip Hop music, Literature, Art & Independent Film screenings.

Here, visitors can experience authentic street culture, fashion, music, stalls, gourmet, colour festival and so much more! The perfect way to experience Soweto and socialize with all of the artists.

VILAKAZI STREET in Soweto, South Africa is well-known for its rich history, particularly for its place in the struggle against apartheid. Given this, it is one of the main tourist attractions in Joburg, and the country.

‘Talent Over Everything Sessions’

‘TOES’ is a hip hop based duo consisting of musicians Thabiso Thabethe and Prodigenius. The band blends alternative folk music with rap to create a unique hip hop sound and style. Their music is influenced by artists such as HHP, Freshly Ground, and The Parlotones.

Lindi Roaming the Streets

The band originated in Winterveld (Sgandi), South Africa in 2014, when this dynamic team started off by performing concerts in Prodigenius’ father’s backyard. This developed into door to door music sessions, music mobs on the streets, performing on trains in Winterveld, and around Pretoria. TOES is currently performing music from Thabiso Thabethe’s 9 track EP tiled “SHEBAH” and The Genius Touch’s 10 track EP titled “Kastom Kult,” both released in 2016 independently through hard copies and Soundcloud.

‘Zimbabwe Showing Flames’

LYNOL BROWN

This multi-talented young man born in Gweru Zimbabwe was named after legend Lionel Richie. He is an Afro Contemporary artist with a mixture of Pop and Afrisoul.

Lindi Roaming the Streets

“Copying denies collaboration as it is a trade amongst artist. It also affects musicians and lead to them forgetting they are the product.” When he arrived in SA, he realised that he’s going to represent his identity and culture. His main aim was to send a clear, outspoken message understood by all.

“Copying kills the potency in the art.”

Lindi Roaming the Streets

Ringo Madlingozi and Oliver Mtukuzi better watch out for the tremor approaching!!!

“You’ll never go anywhere nor be recognised if you do not want to learn. Team effort is success, and with our different skills the world is just an oyster. Learn to stand your ground and take yourself seriously in order for people to. Believe in your craft and be unapologetic about it, and most importantly give and receive.” His advice to people is to wait for your time, stick to what you do best and let it manifest as our fruits have different seasons.

“Happiness is what keeps me going.”

Many thanks to the @THEBOXSHOP for hosting this prestigious event…

Lindi Roaming the Streets

 

 

DEAR AFRICA…

 

Lindi Roaming the Streets‘MY SCARS’

“The more difficult the process to become whole again;

The pain may fade but scars serve as a reminder of our suffering, and make the bearer all the more resolved and never to be wounded again.

So as time moves along, we get lost in distractions, act out in frustration, and react with aggression giving into anger and all the while we plot and plan as we wait to grow stronger, and before we know it, the time passes. We are healed, ready to begin a new…”

 

‘MAMA AFRICA’

BY MANTALA NKOATSE

A seed like myself only needs to develop into roots

Feel the breath of Mother Earth in my Habitat; give a Shelter to Bugs or Sparrows.

I need to feel Mother Earths tears in my habitat, Let her Sunshine nurture my lungs.

I need to grow, I need to be an example of strength, I need to be  a firm stem.

I need to be like Green Leaves Clothed in Mamas Favourite Green dress, I need to be Chlorophyll.

I need to gain beauty from my petals, I the seed; want to become a Flower!

I want to make butterflies smile as I take my duties of Brightening  the World.

For the World needs to be mothered before it turns an orphan.

Dear mama Africa; I need my Great Gran Children to Enjoy the Pleasures of your beauty like my ancestors did before they died.

I don’t want to fear War that will leave my habitat in draught, I don’t want to see my Petals wither, chasing butterflies away.

I don’t want to fear the Sparrows that will be left homeless. I don’t want to fear anything.

I want to be in nature, I want your picture to inspire me to emancipate my mind. I want to relish on your ground after I’ve turned an ancestor.

Mama Africa, I want your beauty to remain timeless

Now, Dear Mother! Hear my cry when I call upon your name.  Forgive my sins for I have polluted your breath with smoke and I let the World disturb your music, created by birds and the Ocean.

Forgive me for I have demolished some of the habitats to gain the pleasures of my material self, I have realized that the World is not as Important as you are because you gave birth to the World.

Mother, without you there’s no more me, or birds or butterflies or trees or the ocean

Dear Mother Africa. Stay Strong and quench my strength with your mountains, inspire my beauty with all that you are, provoke my emotions with your ocean.  Mama Africa, please keep clean for the sake of your legacy.

 Lindi Roaming the Streets 

  

Alive with possibilities is what we are!

Lindi Roaming the Streets

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Lindi Roaming the Streets of The Social Market in Pretoria

In this edition of Lindi Roaming the Streets, Lindi explores South Africa’s The Social Market Pretoria.

Lindi Roaming the Streets

“The most potent weapon in the hands of the oppressor is the mind of the oppressed. Being black is not a matter of pigmentation – being black is a reflection of a mental attitude. Black Consciousness is an attitude of the mind and a way of life, the most positive call to emanate from the black world for a long time” ~ Steve Bantu Biko’.

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Lindi Roaming the StreetsThis young lady spews Consciousness.

She labels herself as a socio-artist for the reason that she does her social work through art. This 23 year old was born in the dusty streets of Alexandra (Johannesburg, South Africa), a one square mile township filled with music, art, and the reality of nature’s life. She discovered a poet in herself at the age of fifteen, when she was introduced to Hip-Hop. In 2011 she became a part of a global girl activism movement; The V-girls and has been an art-activist since. She was inspired to host intellectual dialogues in her community as she saw the need for discussions in her community. Her highlight of 2012 was when she performed for an opening speech of the South African President, Mr. Jacob Zuma during the Alexandra Centenary Celebration. Her first book, published by Diaspora Publishers (2014), was titled “Psychological Cripple,” with the help from a beautiful soul named Barbara Mhangami-Ruwende.

Lindi Roaming the Streets   Lindi Roaming the Streets

Mantala Nkaotse

#BLACKGIRLSROCK

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Lindi Roaming the StreetsBorn of South African/Zambian decent and the influence of fine arts within the family, he started photography straight after high school. “Oh haha, did I mention that this was done with an iPhone?”

Ron Ndlovu’s passion for photography gradually became hunger, which led him to refrigeration and other odd jobs to save up for his dream. His first baby was a SONY NEX F3, a small entry level camera which did the job.

Through his regular posts on social media he was spotted, and did small gigs at kid’s parties and lifestyle shoots which later developed into a series of NOIR shots. This became his niche and led to the birth of GreyScale.

At an amateur stage, he did charity to large scale events, learning the ins and outs of the industry.

This multi-talented young man takes time to consult with up and coming musicians helping with song writing and production. “Secretly, I too can hold a note” he reckons…

Lindi Roaming the Streets

“The world is black and white, but  every story has a shade of grey”

@jay_dundidit

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“Let’s just be who we really are”

Lindi Roaming the Streets

Is that even possible in the conformed world we live in? Is it???

Well, these young geniuses from Venda (Limpopo Province) South Africa have flipped the stereotypes to what we call “CULTURE”. The Social Market Pretoria started in September 2014, whereby a platform for young entrepreneurs was created, to uplift and showcase their work in an inviting atmosphere of color, fashion, music, artistry and, most importantly, freedom of self-expression.

“We like everything about this movement, to us it’s like a beautiful African sunrise. One of the many signs of a very much alive African youth – the future not only looks beautiful, but also business minded and fierce in its expression.”

@seezor_sizzles

Lindi Roaming the Streets   Lindi Roaming the Streets

@maitele_wawe and @thifhe_sliq

“We saw a demand for a space in Pretoria where people with the same artistic, creative mind set could meet up and enjoy good music and company while being themselves,” says co-founder Maitele Wawe. Creating a social economy in the capital city, the market provides a platform for budding entrepreneurs to sell their products in a fresh environment.

Lindi Roaming the Streets    Lindi Roaming the Streets

From thrift stores to the latest hair products and the tastiest gourmet food, it’s all there to be explored.

Lindi Roaming the Streets    Lindi Roaming the Streets

“The difference is the nonconformity of the fashionistas that gather every first Sunday of the month, rocking crazy beautiful outfits that left us feeling as though we were flipping pages from a 3D fashion catalogue.”

Lindi Roaming the Streets

Lindi Roaming the Streets Lindi Roaming the Streets Lindi Roaming the Streets Lindi Roaming the Streets Lindi Roaming the Streets

Lindi Roaming the Streets

Before the Social Market, Pretoria had very limited spaces for creatives to come together and share ideas. Since its birth, word has been traveling across social media networks that the Social Market is the place to be.

@THESOCIALMARKET

Lindi Roaming the Streets

Pretoria has always had an inscrutable nature about it, particularly where art and creativity is concerned. The social market is a brilliant concept thought of by a vibrant collective of creatives who want to not only build and preserve culture and fashion in Pretoria, but also want to empower other young people, creative or not.

Lindi Roaming the Streets Lindi Roaming the Streets Lindi Roaming the Streets Lindi Roaming the Streets

Champions aren’t made in gyms. They are made from something they have deep down inside them – a desire, a dream, and a vision. They have to have the skill, and the will. But the will must be stronger than the skill.

This trio is what we refer to as the FASHION REBELS!

Lindi Roaming the Streets

“The challenge about success is keeping quiet about it”

Lindi Roaming the Streets

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Lindi Roaming the Streets
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Lindi Roaming the Streets of Johannesburg, South Africa

Lindi Roaming the StreetsIn this edition of Lindi Roaming the Streets, Lindi explores South Africa Fashion Week in Hyde Park Corner of Johannesburg.

“Only those who go too far can possibly know how far they can go.”

This for me goes hand-in-glove with fashion; better yet “freedom”.A form of expression, driven by the act of fearlessness… To a point where ones’ story is told through their ageless soul of adventure, sparking the skills of simplicity, authenticity and serenity.

“As I strut my short long legs on the streets of JOZI.

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”Happiness that derives from the hope that inner-peace as invincible as my imagination lives on. Nothing is more creative, nor destructive than a brilliant mind with a purpose.

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That “misunderstood” old man, who wakes up in the morning just to play his keys on the corner of Juta and De Beer Street. Not because he wants anything from anyone, but because this misunderstood genius feels that he has more to offer, than the lads driving past him in big cars with flashy rims and a fat bank account.

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I’m talking about “uMama” who wakes up with a smile knowing that the woodwork she sells at Braamfontein on a Saturday will be enough for a weeks’ meal. The same woman, that sold handmade spoons and dishes for her kid’s Varsity tuition. #FEESMUSTFALL

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The term rétro has been in use since the 1970s to describe on the hand new artefacts that self-consciously refer to particular modes, motifs, techniques, and materials of the past. But on the other hand, some people (incorrectly) use the term to categorise styles that have been created in the past. Retro style refers to new things that display characteristics of the past. It is mostly the recent past retro seeks to recapitulate, focusing on the products, fashions and artistic styles produced since the Industrial Revolution, of Modernity. The word “retro” derives from the Latin prefix retro, meaning backwards, or in past times.

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Well I would like to refer to this as the “New age Evolution”

“Imagination is the air in the mind”

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Stepping out of the conformed definition of freedom is one of the most knotty challenges one can face, but for me this requires tact of some sort, merely because anyone who lives within their means, suffers from a lack of imagination.

“Live on Fashionista, Live on!!!”

 

 

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